Making the organization fly: organizational identification and citizenship in full-service and low-cost airlines

Kim Peters*, Passagorn Tevichapong, S. Alexander Haslam, Tom Postmes

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Recently, the service industry has seen a low-cost sector emerge alongside the traditional full-service sector. We explored whether these business models have different implications for employee cooperation, one factor that plays an important role in organizational functioning. Drawing on the social identity perspective, we argue that employees will identify less strongly with the lower-status, low-cost organizations, reducing their intrinsic motivation for such cooperation. We tested these relationships among employees in Thailand's airline industry. In line with expectations, flight attendants working for low-cost airlines (N = 77) perceived their organizations to have lower status than those working for the full-service airlines (N = 77), and this was associated with reduced organizational identification. This in turn predicted lower levels of organizational citizenship behaviour and a stronger desire for organizational exit.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)145-148
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Personnel Psychology
Volume9
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2010

Keywords

  • airlines
  • employee cooperation
  • organizational identification
  • organizational status
  • service sector
  • Thailand

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Making the organization fly: organizational identification and citizenship in full-service and low-cost airlines'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this