Mapping group knowledge

Duncan Shaw*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingEntry for encyclopedia/dictionary

Abstract

During group meetings it is often difficult for participants to effectively: share their knowledge to inform the outcome; acquire new knowledge from others to broaden and/or deepen their understanding; utilise all available knowledge to design an outcome; and record (to retain) the rationale behind the outcome to inform future activities. These are difficult because, for example: only one person can share knowledge at once which challenges effective sharing; information overload makes acquisition problematic and can marginalize important knowledge; and intense dialog of conflicting views makes recording more complex.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationEncyclopedia of knowledge management
EditorsDavid Schwartz, Dov Te'eni
PublisherIGI Global
Pages1072-1081
Number of pages10
Volume1
Edition2nd
ISBN (Electronic)978-1-5990-4932-8
ISBN (Print)978-1-5990-493-1-1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2010

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recording
dialogue
human being
knowledge
Group
Information overload
Rationale

Cite this

Shaw, D. (2010). Mapping group knowledge. In D. Schwartz, & D. Te'eni (Eds.), Encyclopedia of knowledge management (2nd ed., Vol. 1, pp. 1072-1081). IGI Global. https://doi.org/10.4018/978-1-59904-931-1.ch102
Shaw, Duncan. / Mapping group knowledge. Encyclopedia of knowledge management. editor / David Schwartz ; Dov Te'eni. Vol. 1 2nd. ed. IGI Global, 2010. pp. 1072-1081
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Shaw, D 2010, Mapping group knowledge. in D Schwartz & D Te'eni (eds), Encyclopedia of knowledge management. 2nd edn, vol. 1, IGI Global, pp. 1072-1081. https://doi.org/10.4018/978-1-59904-931-1.ch102

Mapping group knowledge. / Shaw, Duncan.

Encyclopedia of knowledge management. ed. / David Schwartz; Dov Te'eni. Vol. 1 2nd. ed. IGI Global, 2010. p. 1072-1081.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingEntry for encyclopedia/dictionary

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Shaw D. Mapping group knowledge. In Schwartz D, Te'eni D, editors, Encyclopedia of knowledge management. 2nd ed. Vol. 1. IGI Global. 2010. p. 1072-1081 https://doi.org/10.4018/978-1-59904-931-1.ch102