Mass spectrometry imaging of pharmacological compounds in tissue sections

Richard J.A. Goodwin, Andrew R Pitt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The use of MS imaging (MSI) to resolve the spatial and pharmacodynamic distributions of compounds in tissues is emerging as a powerful tool for pharmacological research. Unlike established imaging techniques, only limited a priori knowledge is required and no extensive manipulation (e.g., radiolabeling) of drugs is necessary prior to dosing. MS provides highly multiplexed detection, making it possible to identify compounds, their metabolites and other changes in biomolecular abundances directly off tissue sections in a single pass. This can be employed to obtain near cellular, or potentially subcellular, resolution images. Consideration of technical limitations that affect the process is required, from sample preparation through to analyte ionization and detection. The techniques have only recently been adapted for imaging and novel variations to the established MSI methodologies will further enhance the application of MSI for pharmacological research.
LanguageEnglish
Pages279-293
Number of pages15
JournalBioanalysis
Volume2
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2010

Fingerprint

Mass spectrometry
Mass Spectrometry
Pharmacology
Tissue
Imaging techniques
Research
Pharmacodynamics
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Image resolution
Metabolites
Ionization

Keywords

  • animals
  • histocytological preparation techniques
  • humans
  • mass spectrometry
  • molecular imaging
  • pharmaceutical preparations

Cite this

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Mass spectrometry imaging of pharmacological compounds in tissue sections. / Goodwin, Richard J.A.; Pitt, Andrew R.

In: Bioanalysis, Vol. 2, No. 2, 02.2010, p. 279-293.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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