Medication usage change in older people (65+) in England over 20 years: findings from CFAS I and CFAS II

L Gao, Ian Maidment, Fiona E Matthews, Louise Robinson, Carol Brayne,

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: medical practice has changed over the last decades reflecting the ageing population, when multi-morbidity requiring multiple medications is more common.

Objective: describe and quantify self-reported medicine use including both prescription and over the counter medicines in two comparable population-based studies of older people (65+) in England and to assess the nature and scale of polypharmacy.

Methods: data used were from two separate population-based studies; the Cognitive Function Ageing Study I and II. Descriptive analyses were performed to summarise and quantify general medicine use. Negative binomial regression models were fitted to determine factors associated with the number of medicines used.

Results: medication use, including both prescribed medicines and over the counter products has increased dramatically over the last 2 decades. The number of people taking five or more items quadrupled from 12 to 49%, while the proportion of people who did not take any medication has decreased from around 1 in 5 to 1 in 13. Cardiovascular drugs were the most frequently taken medication. Polypharmacy is associated with increases in the number of diagnosed long-term conditions.

Conclusions: comparison between CFAS I and II reveals marked increases in medication usage and polypharmacy in the older population. The influence of healthcare organisation, introduction of new guidelines and technology changes leading to diagnosis of earlier, milder chronic diseases and treatment may be contributing to this changing pattern. Further research is needed to develop practical solutions to optimise medication management in older people, reducing the harming associated with medication.

LanguageEnglish
Pages1-6
Number of pages6
JournalAge and Ageing
VolumeEarly view
Early online date26 Sep 2017
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 26 Sep 2017

Fingerprint

Polypharmacy
England
Population
Medicine
Cardiovascular Agents
Statistical Models
Cognition
Prescriptions
Chronic Disease
Organizations
Guidelines
Technology
Morbidity
Delivery of Health Care
Research
Therapeutics

Bibliographical note

© The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society.All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

Funding: the Department of Health; the Medical Research Council (MRC U105292687); the National Institute of Health Research (Grant number G9901400, G0601022).

Keywords

  • polypharmacy, ageing population, medication change, older people

Cite this

Gao, L ; Maidment, Ian ; Matthews, Fiona E ; Robinson, Louise ; Brayne, Carol. / Medication usage change in older people (65+) in England over 20 years : findings from CFAS I and CFAS II. In: Age and Ageing. 2017 ; Vol. Early view. pp. 1-6.
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abstract = "Background: medical practice has changed over the last decades reflecting the ageing population, when multi-morbidity requiring multiple medications is more common.Objective: describe and quantify self-reported medicine use including both prescription and over the counter medicines in two comparable population-based studies of older people (65+) in England and to assess the nature and scale of polypharmacy.Methods: data used were from two separate population-based studies; the Cognitive Function Ageing Study I and II. Descriptive analyses were performed to summarise and quantify general medicine use. Negative binomial regression models were fitted to determine factors associated with the number of medicines used.Results: medication use, including both prescribed medicines and over the counter products has increased dramatically over the last 2 decades. The number of people taking five or more items quadrupled from 12 to 49{\%}, while the proportion of people who did not take any medication has decreased from around 1 in 5 to 1 in 13. Cardiovascular drugs were the most frequently taken medication. Polypharmacy is associated with increases in the number of diagnosed long-term conditions.Conclusions: comparison between CFAS I and II reveals marked increases in medication usage and polypharmacy in the older population. The influence of healthcare organisation, introduction of new guidelines and technology changes leading to diagnosis of earlier, milder chronic diseases and treatment may be contributing to this changing pattern. Further research is needed to develop practical solutions to optimise medication management in older people, reducing the harming associated with medication.",
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Medication usage change in older people (65+) in England over 20 years : findings from CFAS I and CFAS II. / Gao, L; Maidment, Ian; Matthews, Fiona E; Robinson, Louise; Brayne, Carol.

In: Age and Ageing, Vol. Early view, 26.09.2017, p. 1-6.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Medication usage change in older people (65+) in England over 20 years

T2 - Age and Ageing

AU - Gao, L

AU - Maidment, Ian

AU - Matthews, Fiona E

AU - Robinson, Louise

AU - Brayne, Carol

N1 - © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society.All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com. Funding: the Department of Health; the Medical Research Council (MRC U105292687); the National Institute of Health Research (Grant number G9901400, G0601022).

PY - 2017/9/26

Y1 - 2017/9/26

N2 - Background: medical practice has changed over the last decades reflecting the ageing population, when multi-morbidity requiring multiple medications is more common.Objective: describe and quantify self-reported medicine use including both prescription and over the counter medicines in two comparable population-based studies of older people (65+) in England and to assess the nature and scale of polypharmacy.Methods: data used were from two separate population-based studies; the Cognitive Function Ageing Study I and II. Descriptive analyses were performed to summarise and quantify general medicine use. Negative binomial regression models were fitted to determine factors associated with the number of medicines used.Results: medication use, including both prescribed medicines and over the counter products has increased dramatically over the last 2 decades. The number of people taking five or more items quadrupled from 12 to 49%, while the proportion of people who did not take any medication has decreased from around 1 in 5 to 1 in 13. Cardiovascular drugs were the most frequently taken medication. Polypharmacy is associated with increases in the number of diagnosed long-term conditions.Conclusions: comparison between CFAS I and II reveals marked increases in medication usage and polypharmacy in the older population. The influence of healthcare organisation, introduction of new guidelines and technology changes leading to diagnosis of earlier, milder chronic diseases and treatment may be contributing to this changing pattern. Further research is needed to develop practical solutions to optimise medication management in older people, reducing the harming associated with medication.

AB - Background: medical practice has changed over the last decades reflecting the ageing population, when multi-morbidity requiring multiple medications is more common.Objective: describe and quantify self-reported medicine use including both prescription and over the counter medicines in two comparable population-based studies of older people (65+) in England and to assess the nature and scale of polypharmacy.Methods: data used were from two separate population-based studies; the Cognitive Function Ageing Study I and II. Descriptive analyses were performed to summarise and quantify general medicine use. Negative binomial regression models were fitted to determine factors associated with the number of medicines used.Results: medication use, including both prescribed medicines and over the counter products has increased dramatically over the last 2 decades. The number of people taking five or more items quadrupled from 12 to 49%, while the proportion of people who did not take any medication has decreased from around 1 in 5 to 1 in 13. Cardiovascular drugs were the most frequently taken medication. Polypharmacy is associated with increases in the number of diagnosed long-term conditions.Conclusions: comparison between CFAS I and II reveals marked increases in medication usage and polypharmacy in the older population. The influence of healthcare organisation, introduction of new guidelines and technology changes leading to diagnosis of earlier, milder chronic diseases and treatment may be contributing to this changing pattern. Further research is needed to develop practical solutions to optimise medication management in older people, reducing the harming associated with medication.

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SN - 0002-0729

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