Mobile note taking: investigating the efficacy of mobile text entry

Joanna Lumsden, Andrew Gammell

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

When designing interaction techniques for mobile devices we must ensure users are able to safely navigate through their physical environment while interacting with their mobile device. Non-speech audio has proven effective at improving interaction on mobile devices by allowing users to maintain visual focus on environmental navigation while presenting information to them via their audio channel. The research described here builds on this to create an audio-enhanced single-stroke-based text entry facility that demands as little visual resource as possible. An evaluation of the system demonstrated that users were more aware of their errors when dynamically guided by audio-feedback. The study also highlighted the effect of handwriting style and mobility on text entry; designers of handwriting recognizers and of applications involving mobile note taking can use this fundamental knowledge to further develop their systems to better support the mobility of mobile text entry.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMobile human - computer interaction : MobileHCI 2004
Subtitle of host publication6th international symposium, MobileHCI, Glasgow, UK, September 13 - 16, 2004. Proceedings
EditorsStephen Brewster, Mark Dunlop
Place of PublicationBerlin (DE)
PublisherSpringer
Pages156-167
Number of pages12
ISBN (Electronic)978-3-540-28637-0
ISBN (Print)978-3-540-23086-1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004
Event6th international symposium, MobileHCI - Glasgow, United Kingdom
Duration: 13 Sep 200416 Sep 2004

Publication series

NameLecture notes in computer science
PublisherSpringer
Volume3160
ISSN (Print)0302-9743
ISSN (Electronic)1611-3349

Symposium

Symposium6th international symposium, MobileHCI
Abbreviated titleMobileHCI 2004
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityGlasgow
Period13/09/0416/09/04

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Lumsden, J., & Gammell, A. (2004). Mobile note taking: investigating the efficacy of mobile text entry. In S. Brewster, & M. Dunlop (Eds.), Mobile human - computer interaction : MobileHCI 2004: 6th international symposium, MobileHCI, Glasgow, UK, September 13 - 16, 2004. Proceedings (pp. 156-167). (Lecture notes in computer science; Vol. 3160). Berlin (DE): Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-28637-0_14
Lumsden, Joanna ; Gammell, Andrew. / Mobile note taking : investigating the efficacy of mobile text entry. Mobile human - computer interaction : MobileHCI 2004: 6th international symposium, MobileHCI, Glasgow, UK, September 13 - 16, 2004. Proceedings. editor / Stephen Brewster ; Mark Dunlop. Berlin (DE) : Springer, 2004. pp. 156-167 (Lecture notes in computer science).
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Lumsden, J & Gammell, A 2004, Mobile note taking: investigating the efficacy of mobile text entry. in S Brewster & M Dunlop (eds), Mobile human - computer interaction : MobileHCI 2004: 6th international symposium, MobileHCI, Glasgow, UK, September 13 - 16, 2004. Proceedings. Lecture notes in computer science, vol. 3160, Springer, Berlin (DE), pp. 156-167, 6th international symposium, MobileHCI, Glasgow, United Kingdom, 13/09/04. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-28637-0_14

Mobile note taking : investigating the efficacy of mobile text entry. / Lumsden, Joanna; Gammell, Andrew.

Mobile human - computer interaction : MobileHCI 2004: 6th international symposium, MobileHCI, Glasgow, UK, September 13 - 16, 2004. Proceedings. ed. / Stephen Brewster; Mark Dunlop. Berlin (DE) : Springer, 2004. p. 156-167 (Lecture notes in computer science; Vol. 3160).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Lumsden J, Gammell A. Mobile note taking: investigating the efficacy of mobile text entry. In Brewster S, Dunlop M, editors, Mobile human - computer interaction : MobileHCI 2004: 6th international symposium, MobileHCI, Glasgow, UK, September 13 - 16, 2004. Proceedings. Berlin (DE): Springer. 2004. p. 156-167. (Lecture notes in computer science). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-28637-0_14