Morningness-eveningness orientation and attitude change: evidence for greater systematic processing and attitude change at optimal time-of-day

Pearl Y. Martin, Robin Martin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study examines the relationship between morningness-eveningness orientation and time-of day on attitude change, and tests the hypothesis that people will be more persuaded when tested at their optimal time-of-day (i.e., morning for M-types and evening for E-types) than non-optimal time-of-day (i.e., evening for M-Types and morning for E-types). Two hundred and twenty participants read a message that contained either strong vs. weak quality counter-attitudinal arguments (anti-voluntary euthanasia) in the morning (9.00. a.m.) or in the evening (7.00. p.m.). When tested at their respective optimal time-of-day (for both M- and E-types) there was a reliable difference in attitude change between the strong vs. weak messages (indicating message processing had occurred) while there was no difference between strong vs. weak messages when tested at their non-optimal time-of-day. In addition, the amount of message-congruent thinking mediated the attitude change. The results show that M- and E-types pay greater attention to and elaborate on a persuasive message at their optimal time-of-day, and this leads to increased attitude change, compared to those tested at their non-optimal time-of-day.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)551-556
Number of pages6
JournalPersonality and Individual Differences
Volume54
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2013

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Euthanasia, Active, Voluntary
Thinking

Keywords

  • morningness–eveningness
  • chronotype
  • time-of-day
  • attitude change
  • persuasion

Cite this

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Morningness-eveningness orientation and attitude change : evidence for greater systematic processing and attitude change at optimal time-of-day. / Martin, Pearl Y.; Martin, Robin.

In: Personality and Individual Differences, Vol. 54, No. 5, 04.2013, p. 551-556.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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