Multiparticulate systems for paediatric drug delivery

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)

Abstract

This chapter explores the feasibility of formulating drugs as multiparticulates for children. The paediatric population is diverse and ranges from preterm infants to teenagers between 16 and 18 years of age. Salient physiological differences exist within this population as compared with adults which translate to significant changes in pharmacokinetic characteristics of administered drugs. Thus paediatrics should not be treated as ‘miniature’ adults requiring simple dose reduction during drug therapy administration. Factors such as physiology/drug pharmacokinetics, child capability, duration and frequency of therapy, convenience and acceptability as well as impact on caregivers must be considered during choice and design of paediatric dosage forms. Multiparticulates are solid dosage forms containing small discrete spherical subunits <2.5 mm in size, with each unit displaying characteristic functionalities that are independent of other subunits. Multiparticulates present a versatile and convenient dosage form with multiple applications such that they can be sprinkled on semisolid meals for younger children, or compressed into fast disintegrating tablets for older children. Major considerations during paediatric multiparticulate drug development include palatability and taste masking since these are oral dosage forms that release the drug in close proximity of the taste buds, robustness of coatings that give each subunit its individualised functionality, safe use of excipients as well as the ease of extemporaneous preparations where individual dose titration may be required. The World Health Organization (WHO) has proposed a paradigm shift from the use of liquids to age-appropriate solid dosage forms for paediatrics, and this may result in an increased number of approved multiparticulate paediatric formulations in the market.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationMultiparticulate drug delivery
Subtitle of host publicationformulation, processing and manufacture
EditorsAli R. Rajabi-Siahboomi
Place of PublicationNew York< NY (US)
PublisherSpringer
Pages213-236
Number of pages24
ISBN (Electronic)978-1-4939-7012-4
ISBN (Print)978-1-4939-7010-0
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Publication series

NameAdvances in Delivery Science Technology
PublisherSpringer

Fingerprint

Drug Delivery Systems
Dosage Forms
Pediatrics
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Pharmacokinetics
Taste Buds
Excipients
Premature Infants
Caregivers
Population
Tablets
Meals
Drug Therapy

Keywords

  • paediatric
  • preterm
  • infants
  • children
  • multiparticulates
  • paediatric considerations
  • paediatric dosage forms
  • sprinkles
  • dispersible powders
  • versatile dosage forms

Cite this

Iyrie, A., & Mohammed, A. R. (2017). Multiparticulate systems for paediatric drug delivery. In A. R. Rajabi-Siahboomi (Ed.), Multiparticulate drug delivery: formulation, processing and manufacture (pp. 213-236). (Advances in Delivery Science Technology). New York< NY (US): Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-7012-4_9
Iyrie, Affiong ; Mohammed, Afzal R. / Multiparticulate systems for paediatric drug delivery. Multiparticulate drug delivery: formulation, processing and manufacture. editor / Ali R. Rajabi-Siahboomi. New York< NY (US) : Springer, 2017. pp. 213-236 (Advances in Delivery Science Technology).
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Iyrie, A & Mohammed, AR 2017, Multiparticulate systems for paediatric drug delivery. in AR Rajabi-Siahboomi (ed.), Multiparticulate drug delivery: formulation, processing and manufacture. Advances in Delivery Science Technology, Springer, New York< NY (US), pp. 213-236. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-7012-4_9

Multiparticulate systems for paediatric drug delivery. / Iyrie, Affiong; Mohammed, Afzal R.

Multiparticulate drug delivery: formulation, processing and manufacture. ed. / Ali R. Rajabi-Siahboomi. New York< NY (US) : Springer, 2017. p. 213-236 (Advances in Delivery Science Technology).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)

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KW - paediatric considerations

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KW - sprinkles

KW - dispersible powders

KW - versatile dosage forms

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SN - 978-1-4939-7010-0

T3 - Advances in Delivery Science Technology

SP - 213

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Iyrie A, Mohammed AR. Multiparticulate systems for paediatric drug delivery. In Rajabi-Siahboomi AR, editor, Multiparticulate drug delivery: formulation, processing and manufacture. New York< NY (US): Springer. 2017. p. 213-236. (Advances in Delivery Science Technology). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-7012-4_9