Neuroimaging and psychophysiological measurement in organizational research: an agenda for research in organizational cognitive neuroscience

Nick J. Lee, Laura Chamberlain

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Although organizational research has made tremendous strides in the last century, recent advances in neuroscience and the imaging of functional brain activity remain underused. In fact, even the use of well-established psychophysiological measurement tools is comparatively rare. Following the lead of social cognitive neuroscience, in this review, we conceptualize organizational cognitive neuroscience as a field dedicated to exploring the processes within the brain that underlie or influence human decisions, behaviors, and interactions either (a) within organizations or (b) in response to organizational manifestations or institutions. We discuss organizational cognitive neuroscience, bringing together work that may previously have been characterized rather atomistically, and provide a brief overview of individual methods that may be of use. Subsequently, we discuss the possible convergence and integration of the different neuroimaging and psychophysiological measurement modalities. A brief review of prior work in the field shows a significant need for a more coherent and theory-driven approach to organizational cognitive neuroscience. In response, we discuss a recent example of such work, along with three hypothetical case studies that exemplify the link between organizational and psychological theory and neuroscientific methods.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)18-42
Number of pages25
JournalAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Volume1118
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2007

Keywords

  • organizational cognitive neuroscience
  • social cognitive neuroscience
  • neuroimaging
  • psychophysiology
  • neuroeconomics
  • neuromarketing

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