Object-and location-based inhibition in goal-directed action: Inhibition of return reveals behavioural and anatomical dissociations and interactions with memory processes

Sarah Grison*, Klaus Kessler, Matthew A. Paul, Heather Jordan, Steven P. Tipper

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

One way to increase understanding of the mechanisms that guide action towards relevant information is to examine processing of irrelevant information. In particular, our research suggests that goal-directed behaviour is aided by inhibition of irrelevant location- and object-based representations. Evidence from the inhibition of return (IOR) paradigm indicates that the nature of a task and the goals of action result in differing representational loci of inhibition, which elicit different behavioural effects and are mediated by distinct neural systems. Interestingly, our new research indicates that inhibition of object-based representations in particular can mediate response over longer periods. Support is provided here for IOR over six previously cued objects and delays of nearly 4 s, which suggests that action is aided by online maintenance of object inhibition in working memory. Importantly, we also provide the first evidence of long-term IOR effects over nearly 100 displays and 20 min, which indicate that inhibition of objects, but not object-less spatial locations, leaves a retrievable trace in episodic memory that affects behaviour over time. In summary, while inhibition of irrelevant objects and locations both aid correct transient response, goal-directed action over time may be mediated by retrieval of prior inhibitory processes.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAttention in Action
Subtitle of host publicationAdvances from Cognitive Neuroscience
PublisherPsychology Press
Pages171-210
Number of pages40
ISBN (Print)0203449223, 9780203449226
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 24 Nov 2004

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    Grison, S., Kessler, K., Paul, M. A., Jordan, H., & Tipper, S. P. (2004). Object-and location-based inhibition in goal-directed action: Inhibition of return reveals behavioural and anatomical dissociations and interactions with memory processes. In Attention in Action: Advances from Cognitive Neuroscience (pp. 171-210). Psychology Press. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203449226