On the interaction between perceptual and response selection: neuropsychological evidence

Luc Boutsen, Glyn W. Humphreys

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We examined the relations between selection for perception and selection for action in a patient FK, with bilateral damage to his temporal and medial frontal cortices. The task required a simple grasp response to a common object (a cup) in the presence of a distractor (another cup). The target was cued by colour or location, and FK made manual responses. We examined the effects on performance of cued and uncued dimensions of both the target and the distractor. FK was impaired at perceptually selecting the target when cued by colour, when the target colour but not its location changed on successive trials. The effect was sensitive to the relative orientations of targets and distractors, indicating an effect of action selection on perceptual selection, when perceptual selection was weakly instantiated. The dimension-specific carry-over effect on reaching was enhanced when there was a temporal delay between a cue and the response, and it disappeared when there was a between-trial delay. The results indicate that perceptual and action selection systems interact to determine the efficiency with which actions are selected to particular objects.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)239-250
Number of pages12
JournalNeurocase
Volume9
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2003

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Color
Frontal Lobe
Hand Strength
Cues
Efficiency
Interaction
Distractor

Keywords

  • selection
  • perception
  • action
  • bilateral damage
  • cortex

Cite this

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On the interaction between perceptual and response selection: neuropsychological evidence. / Boutsen, Luc; Humphreys, Glyn W.

In: Neurocase, Vol. 9, No. 3, 06.2003, p. 239-250.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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