Optic flow in human vision: MEG reveals a foveo-fugal bias in V1, specialization for spiral space in hMSTs, and global motion sensitivity in the IPS

Ian E. Holliday, Timothy S. Meese

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Abstract We recorded MEG responses from 17 participants viewing random-dot patterns simulating global optic flow components (expansion, contraction, rotation, deformation, and translation) and a random motion control condition. Theta-band (3–7 Hz), MEG signal power was greater for expansion than the other optic flow components in a region concentrated along the calcarine sulcus, indicating an ecologically valid, foveo-fugal bias for unidirectional motion sensors in V1. When the responses to the optic flow components were combined, a decrease in MEG beta-band (17–23 Hz) power was found in regions extending beyond the calcarine sulcus to the posterior parietal lobe (inferior to IPS), indicating the importance of structured motion in this region. However, only one cortical area, within or near the V5/hMT+ complex, responded to all three spiral-space components (expansion, contraction, and rotation) and showed no selectivity for global translation or deformation: we term this area hMSTs. This is the first demonstration of an exclusive region for spiral space in the human brain and suggests a functional role better suited to preliminary analysis of ego-motion than surface pose, which would involve deformation. We also observed that the rotation condition activated the cerebellum, suggesting its involvement in visually mediated control of postural adjustment.
Original languageEnglish
Article number17
JournalJournal of Vision
Volume8
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Nov 2008

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Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives License

Keywords

  • human vision
  • complex motion
  • V5
  • MT
  • MST
  • intraparietal sulcus
  • radial motion
  • optic flow
  • MEG
  • hMSTs

Cite this

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title = "Optic flow in human vision: MEG reveals a foveo-fugal bias in V1, specialization for spiral space in hMSTs, and global motion sensitivity in the IPS",
abstract = "Abstract We recorded MEG responses from 17 participants viewing random-dot patterns simulating global optic flow components (expansion, contraction, rotation, deformation, and translation) and a random motion control condition. Theta-band (3–7 Hz), MEG signal power was greater for expansion than the other optic flow components in a region concentrated along the calcarine sulcus, indicating an ecologically valid, foveo-fugal bias for unidirectional motion sensors in V1. When the responses to the optic flow components were combined, a decrease in MEG beta-band (17–23 Hz) power was found in regions extending beyond the calcarine sulcus to the posterior parietal lobe (inferior to IPS), indicating the importance of structured motion in this region. However, only one cortical area, within or near the V5/hMT+ complex, responded to all three spiral-space components (expansion, contraction, and rotation) and showed no selectivity for global translation or deformation: we term this area hMSTs. This is the first demonstration of an exclusive region for spiral space in the human brain and suggests a functional role better suited to preliminary analysis of ego-motion than surface pose, which would involve deformation. We also observed that the rotation condition activated the cerebellum, suggesting its involvement in visually mediated control of postural adjustment.",
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author = "Holliday, {Ian E.} and Meese, {Timothy S.}",
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AU - Holliday, Ian E.

AU - Meese, Timothy S.

N1 - Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives License

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N2 - Abstract We recorded MEG responses from 17 participants viewing random-dot patterns simulating global optic flow components (expansion, contraction, rotation, deformation, and translation) and a random motion control condition. Theta-band (3–7 Hz), MEG signal power was greater for expansion than the other optic flow components in a region concentrated along the calcarine sulcus, indicating an ecologically valid, foveo-fugal bias for unidirectional motion sensors in V1. When the responses to the optic flow components were combined, a decrease in MEG beta-band (17–23 Hz) power was found in regions extending beyond the calcarine sulcus to the posterior parietal lobe (inferior to IPS), indicating the importance of structured motion in this region. However, only one cortical area, within or near the V5/hMT+ complex, responded to all three spiral-space components (expansion, contraction, and rotation) and showed no selectivity for global translation or deformation: we term this area hMSTs. This is the first demonstration of an exclusive region for spiral space in the human brain and suggests a functional role better suited to preliminary analysis of ego-motion than surface pose, which would involve deformation. We also observed that the rotation condition activated the cerebellum, suggesting its involvement in visually mediated control of postural adjustment.

AB - Abstract We recorded MEG responses from 17 participants viewing random-dot patterns simulating global optic flow components (expansion, contraction, rotation, deformation, and translation) and a random motion control condition. Theta-band (3–7 Hz), MEG signal power was greater for expansion than the other optic flow components in a region concentrated along the calcarine sulcus, indicating an ecologically valid, foveo-fugal bias for unidirectional motion sensors in V1. When the responses to the optic flow components were combined, a decrease in MEG beta-band (17–23 Hz) power was found in regions extending beyond the calcarine sulcus to the posterior parietal lobe (inferior to IPS), indicating the importance of structured motion in this region. However, only one cortical area, within or near the V5/hMT+ complex, responded to all three spiral-space components (expansion, contraction, and rotation) and showed no selectivity for global translation or deformation: we term this area hMSTs. This is the first demonstration of an exclusive region for spiral space in the human brain and suggests a functional role better suited to preliminary analysis of ego-motion than surface pose, which would involve deformation. We also observed that the rotation condition activated the cerebellum, suggesting its involvement in visually mediated control of postural adjustment.

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