Optical quality for keratoconic eyes with conventional RGP lens and simulated, customised contact lens corrections: a comparison

Amit Jinabhai, W. Neil Charman, Clare O'Donnell, Hema Radhakrishnan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: To compare monochromatic aberrations of keratoconic eyes when uncorrected, corrected with spherically-powered RGP (rigid gas-permeable) contact lenses and corrected using simulations of customised soft contact lenses for different magnitudes of rotation (up to 15°) and translation (up to 1mm) from their ideal position. Methods: The ocular aberrations of examples of mild, moderate and severe keratoconic eyes were measured when uncorrected and when wearing their habitual RGP lenses. Residual aberrations and point-spread functions of each eye were simulated using an ideal, customised soft contact lens (designed to neutralise higher-order aberrations, HOA) were calculated as a function of the angle of rotation of the lens from its ideal orientation, and its horizontal and vertical translation. Results: In agreement with the results of other authors, the RGP lenses markedly reduced both lower-order aberrations and HOA for all three patients. When compared with the RGP lens corrections, the customised lens simulations only provided optical improvements if their movements were constrained within limits which appear to be difficult to achieve with current technologies. Conclusions: At the present time, customised contact lens corrections appear likely to offer, at best, only minor optical improvements over RGP lenses for patients with keratoconus. If made in soft materials, however, these lenses may be preferred by patients in term of comfort.

LanguageEnglish
Pages200-212
Number of pages13
JournalOphthalmic and Physiological Optics
Volume32
Issue number3
Early online date18 Apr 2012
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2012

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Contact Lenses
Lenses
Gases
Hydrophilic Contact Lens
Keratoconus
Technology

Keywords

  • customised lenses
  • higher-order aberrations
  • keratoconus
  • RGP lenses
  • rotation
  • translation

Cite this

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abstract = "Purpose: To compare monochromatic aberrations of keratoconic eyes when uncorrected, corrected with spherically-powered RGP (rigid gas-permeable) contact lenses and corrected using simulations of customised soft contact lenses for different magnitudes of rotation (up to 15°) and translation (up to 1mm) from their ideal position. Methods: The ocular aberrations of examples of mild, moderate and severe keratoconic eyes were measured when uncorrected and when wearing their habitual RGP lenses. Residual aberrations and point-spread functions of each eye were simulated using an ideal, customised soft contact lens (designed to neutralise higher-order aberrations, HOA) were calculated as a function of the angle of rotation of the lens from its ideal orientation, and its horizontal and vertical translation. Results: In agreement with the results of other authors, the RGP lenses markedly reduced both lower-order aberrations and HOA for all three patients. When compared with the RGP lens corrections, the customised lens simulations only provided optical improvements if their movements were constrained within limits which appear to be difficult to achieve with current technologies. Conclusions: At the present time, customised contact lens corrections appear likely to offer, at best, only minor optical improvements over RGP lenses for patients with keratoconus. If made in soft materials, however, these lenses may be preferred by patients in term of comfort.",
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Optical quality for keratoconic eyes with conventional RGP lens and simulated, customised contact lens corrections : a comparison. / Jinabhai, Amit; Charman, W. Neil; O'Donnell, Clare; Radhakrishnan, Hema.

In: Ophthalmic and Physiological Optics, Vol. 32, No. 3, 05.2012, p. 200-212.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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