Pain management programmes for non-English-speaking black and minority ethnic groups with long-term or chronic pain

A.E. Burton, R.L. Shaw

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Increasing ethnic diversity in the UK means that there is a growing need for National Health Service care to be delivered to non-English-speaking patients. The aims of the present systematic review were to: (1) better understand the outcomes of chronic pain management programmes (PMPs) for ethnic minority and non-English-speaking patients and (2) explore the perspectives on and experiences of chronic pain for these groups. A systematic review identified 26 papers meeting the inclusion criteria; no papers reported on the outcomes of PMPs delivered in the UK. Of the papers obtained, four reported on PMPs conducted outside the UK; eight reported on ethnic differences in patients seeking support from pain management services in America; and the remaining papers included literature reviews, an experimental pain study, a collaborative enquiry, and a survey of patient and clinician ratings of pain. The findings indicate a lack of research into UK-based pain management for ethnic minorities and non-English-speaking patients. The literature suggests that effective PMPs must be tailored to meet cultural experiences of pain and beliefs about pain management. There is a need for further research to explore these cultural beliefs in non-English-speaking groups in the UK. Culturally sensitive evaluations of interpreted PMPs with long-term follow-up are needed to assess the effectiveness of current provision.

LanguageEnglish
Pages187-203
Number of pages17
JournalMusculoskeletal Care
Volume13
Issue number4
Early online date18 Mar 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2015

Fingerprint

Minority Groups
Pain Management
Ethnic Groups
Chronic Pain
Pain
National Health Programs
Research
Delivery of Health Care

Bibliographical note

This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Burton, A. E., & Shaw, R. L. (2015). Pain management programmes for non-English-speaking black and minority ethnic groups with long-term or chronic pain. Musculoskeletal Care, 13(4), 187-203, which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/msc.1099. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.

Keywords

  • chronic pain
  • culture
  • ethnicity
  • pain management

Cite this

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Pain management programmes for non-English-speaking black and minority ethnic groups with long-term or chronic pain. / Burton, A.E.; Shaw, R.L.

In: Musculoskeletal Care, Vol. 13, No. 4, 12.2015, p. 187-203.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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