Priming moral self-ambivalence heightens deliberative behaviour in self-ambivalent individuals

Ramesh Perera-Delcourt, Robert A. Nash, Susan J. Thorpe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Recent work on cognitive-behavioural models of obsessive-compulsive disorder has focused on the roles played by various aspects of self-perception. In particular, moral self-ambivalence has been found to be associated with obsessive-compulsive phenomena. Aims: In this study we used an experimental task to investigate whether artificially priming moral self-ambivalence would increase participants' deliberation on ethical problems, an index that might be analogous to obsessive-compulsive behaviour. Method: Non-clinical participants completed two online tasks designed to prime either moral self-ambivalence, general uncertainty, or neither. All participants then completed a task requiring them to consider solutions to moral dilemmas. We recorded the time participants took to respond to the dilemmas and the length of their responses; we then combined these variables to create a measure of deliberation. Results: Priming moral self-ambivalence led to increases in deliberation, but this was only significant among those participants who scored highly on a baseline measure of moral self-ambivalence. Priming general uncertainty had no significant effect upon deliberation. Conclusions: The results suggest that moral self-ambivalence may play a role in the maintenance of obsessive-compulsive behaviour. We propose that individuals who are morally self-ambivalent might respond to situations in which this ambivalence is made salient by exhibiting behaviour with obsessive-compulsive characteristics. These findings have implications for the incorporation of ideas about self-concept into theories of obsessive-compulsive disorder.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)682-692
Number of pages11
JournalBehavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy
Volume42
Issue number6
Early online date27 Sep 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2014

Fingerprint

Obsessive Behavior
Compulsive Behavior
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
Self Concept
Uncertainty
Maintenance

Keywords

  • experiment
  • morality
  • obsessive-compulsive disorder
  • self-ambivalence
  • self-perception

Cite this

@article{c1b282711ebe4465ba65c59ec7d63771,
title = "Priming moral self-ambivalence heightens deliberative behaviour in self-ambivalent individuals",
abstract = "Background: Recent work on cognitive-behavioural models of obsessive-compulsive disorder has focused on the roles played by various aspects of self-perception. In particular, moral self-ambivalence has been found to be associated with obsessive-compulsive phenomena. Aims: In this study we used an experimental task to investigate whether artificially priming moral self-ambivalence would increase participants' deliberation on ethical problems, an index that might be analogous to obsessive-compulsive behaviour. Method: Non-clinical participants completed two online tasks designed to prime either moral self-ambivalence, general uncertainty, or neither. All participants then completed a task requiring them to consider solutions to moral dilemmas. We recorded the time participants took to respond to the dilemmas and the length of their responses; we then combined these variables to create a measure of deliberation. Results: Priming moral self-ambivalence led to increases in deliberation, but this was only significant among those participants who scored highly on a baseline measure of moral self-ambivalence. Priming general uncertainty had no significant effect upon deliberation. Conclusions: The results suggest that moral self-ambivalence may play a role in the maintenance of obsessive-compulsive behaviour. We propose that individuals who are morally self-ambivalent might respond to situations in which this ambivalence is made salient by exhibiting behaviour with obsessive-compulsive characteristics. These findings have implications for the incorporation of ideas about self-concept into theories of obsessive-compulsive disorder.",
keywords = "experiment, morality, obsessive-compulsive disorder, self-ambivalence, self-perception",
author = "Ramesh Perera-Delcourt and Nash, {Robert A.} and Thorpe, {Susan J.}",
year = "2014",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1017/S1352465813000507",
language = "English",
volume = "42",
pages = "682--692",
journal = "Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy",
issn = "1352-4658",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
number = "6",

}

Priming moral self-ambivalence heightens deliberative behaviour in self-ambivalent individuals. / Perera-Delcourt, Ramesh; Nash, Robert A.; Thorpe, Susan J.

In: Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy, Vol. 42, No. 6, 11.2014, p. 682-692.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Priming moral self-ambivalence heightens deliberative behaviour in self-ambivalent individuals

AU - Perera-Delcourt, Ramesh

AU - Nash, Robert A.

AU - Thorpe, Susan J.

PY - 2014/11

Y1 - 2014/11

N2 - Background: Recent work on cognitive-behavioural models of obsessive-compulsive disorder has focused on the roles played by various aspects of self-perception. In particular, moral self-ambivalence has been found to be associated with obsessive-compulsive phenomena. Aims: In this study we used an experimental task to investigate whether artificially priming moral self-ambivalence would increase participants' deliberation on ethical problems, an index that might be analogous to obsessive-compulsive behaviour. Method: Non-clinical participants completed two online tasks designed to prime either moral self-ambivalence, general uncertainty, or neither. All participants then completed a task requiring them to consider solutions to moral dilemmas. We recorded the time participants took to respond to the dilemmas and the length of their responses; we then combined these variables to create a measure of deliberation. Results: Priming moral self-ambivalence led to increases in deliberation, but this was only significant among those participants who scored highly on a baseline measure of moral self-ambivalence. Priming general uncertainty had no significant effect upon deliberation. Conclusions: The results suggest that moral self-ambivalence may play a role in the maintenance of obsessive-compulsive behaviour. We propose that individuals who are morally self-ambivalent might respond to situations in which this ambivalence is made salient by exhibiting behaviour with obsessive-compulsive characteristics. These findings have implications for the incorporation of ideas about self-concept into theories of obsessive-compulsive disorder.

AB - Background: Recent work on cognitive-behavioural models of obsessive-compulsive disorder has focused on the roles played by various aspects of self-perception. In particular, moral self-ambivalence has been found to be associated with obsessive-compulsive phenomena. Aims: In this study we used an experimental task to investigate whether artificially priming moral self-ambivalence would increase participants' deliberation on ethical problems, an index that might be analogous to obsessive-compulsive behaviour. Method: Non-clinical participants completed two online tasks designed to prime either moral self-ambivalence, general uncertainty, or neither. All participants then completed a task requiring them to consider solutions to moral dilemmas. We recorded the time participants took to respond to the dilemmas and the length of their responses; we then combined these variables to create a measure of deliberation. Results: Priming moral self-ambivalence led to increases in deliberation, but this was only significant among those participants who scored highly on a baseline measure of moral self-ambivalence. Priming general uncertainty had no significant effect upon deliberation. Conclusions: The results suggest that moral self-ambivalence may play a role in the maintenance of obsessive-compulsive behaviour. We propose that individuals who are morally self-ambivalent might respond to situations in which this ambivalence is made salient by exhibiting behaviour with obsessive-compulsive characteristics. These findings have implications for the incorporation of ideas about self-concept into theories of obsessive-compulsive disorder.

KW - experiment

KW - morality

KW - obsessive-compulsive disorder

KW - self-ambivalence

KW - self-perception

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84912043814&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1017/S1352465813000507

DO - 10.1017/S1352465813000507

M3 - Article

VL - 42

SP - 682

EP - 692

JO - Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy

JF - Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy

SN - 1352-4658

IS - 6

ER -