Promoting the German navy in the British Empire: the Central League for German Navy Clubs Abroad 1898-1918

Stefan Manz*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)

Abstract

German unification in 1871 not only changed the political, economic and geographical landscape of the country, it also had a significant impact on those Germans who found themselves living outside, or migrating across, the borders of the newly founded Empire. It also focuses on the activities of the Central League in Britain and its Empire. For comparative reasons, some areas outside the Empire also included. Within Britain, five local branches can be identified during the period 1898 to 1914: London, Birmingham, Newcastle, Glasgow, and Edinburgh-Leith. For London, membership numbers obtained, but judging by annual contributions this branch appears strongest in Britain. The article has shown that researching the activities of the Central League in Britain and its Empire can add valuable insights to the mechanics of transnational ethnic network creation, as well as to the nature of potentially frictional contact zones between German migrants and British colonial rule.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationTransnational networks
Subtitle of host publicationGerman migrants in the British Empire
EditorsStefan Manz, John R. Davis, Margrit Schulte Beerbühl
Place of PublicationLeiden (NL)
PublisherBrill
Pages163-179
Number of pages17
ISBN (Electronic)978-90-04-22957-0
ISBN (Print)978-90-04-22349-3, 90-04-22349-5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Apr 2012

Fingerprint

League
British Empire
Clubs
Contact Zone
Birmingham
Ethnic Groups
Economics
Colonial Rule
Migrants
Glasgow
German Unification
Edinburgh
Newcastle

Keywords

  • Britain
  • Central League
  • contributions
  • Empire
  • Germans

Cite this

Manz, S. (2012). Promoting the German navy in the British Empire: the Central League for German Navy Clubs Abroad 1898-1918. In S. Manz, J. R. Davis, & M. Schulte Beerbühl (Eds.), Transnational networks: German migrants in the British Empire (pp. 163-179). Leiden (NL): Brill. https://doi.org/10.1163/9789004229570_010, https://doi.org/10.1163/9789004229570
Manz, Stefan. / Promoting the German navy in the British Empire : the Central League for German Navy Clubs Abroad 1898-1918. Transnational networks: German migrants in the British Empire. editor / Stefan Manz ; John R. Davis ; Margrit Schulte Beerbühl. Leiden (NL) : Brill, 2012. pp. 163-179
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Manz, S 2012, Promoting the German navy in the British Empire: the Central League for German Navy Clubs Abroad 1898-1918. in S Manz, JR Davis & M Schulte Beerbühl (eds), Transnational networks: German migrants in the British Empire. Brill, Leiden (NL), pp. 163-179. https://doi.org/10.1163/9789004229570_010, https://doi.org/10.1163/9789004229570

Promoting the German navy in the British Empire : the Central League for German Navy Clubs Abroad 1898-1918. / Manz, Stefan.

Transnational networks: German migrants in the British Empire. ed. / Stefan Manz; John R. Davis; Margrit Schulte Beerbühl. Leiden (NL) : Brill, 2012. p. 163-179.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)

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Manz S. Promoting the German navy in the British Empire: the Central League for German Navy Clubs Abroad 1898-1918. In Manz S, Davis JR, Schulte Beerbühl M, editors, Transnational networks: German migrants in the British Empire. Leiden (NL): Brill. 2012. p. 163-179 https://doi.org/10.1163/9789004229570_010, https://doi.org/10.1163/9789004229570