Psycholinguistic effects, types of impairments and processing levels in word production: Can we reduce confusions?: A commentary to Mailend, Maas, Beeson, Story & Forster (2021)

Research output: Contribution to journalLetter, comment or opinionpeer-review

Abstract

This commentary highlights three common difficulties faced by the literature that aims to specify models of speech production based on the performance of aphasic speakers, taking as a springboard a recent study by Mailend et al. These include: (1) difficulties with theoretical assumptions which linki psycholinguistic effects unequivocally to one processing level; (2) difficulties using clinical classifications to localize experimental effects; (3) difficulties making theoretical inferences given the controversial nature of the representations that characterize different processing levels. We argue that these three types of difficulties could be ameliorated by studies in which: (1) the level of psycholinguistic effects is demonstrated with converging analyses; (2) clinical classification is not taken as a starting point in studies investigating the nature of an impairment, but, instead, associations between clusters of symptoms are carefully analysed; (3) The nature of processing levels associated with deficits is made clear and results are not over-interpreted as supporting models whose characteristics go beyond an explanation of the results.

Original languageEnglish
JournalCognitive Neuropsychology
Early online date18 Jul 2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 18 Jul 2021

Bibliographical note

This is an Accepted Manuscript version of the following article, accepted for publication in Cognitive Neuropsychology . Cristina Romani (2021) Psycholinguistic effects, types of impairments and processing levels in word production: Can we reduce confusions?, Cognitive Neuropsychology. It is deposited under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Keywords

  • Apraxia of speech
  • methodological issues, diagnosis, phonological errors, phonological interference

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