Psychometric properties of the Italian Versions of the Gambling Urge Scale (GUS) and the Gambling Refusal Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (GRSEQ)

Paolo Iliceto*, Emanuele Fino, Mauro Schiavella, Tian Po Oei

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Gambling urges and gambling refusal self-efficacy beliefs play a major role in the development and maintenance of problem gambling. This study aimed to translate the Gambling Urge
Scale (GUS) and the Gambling Refusal Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (GRSEQ) from English to
Italian (GUS-I, GRSEQ-I) and to test their factor structure, internal consistency, construct
validity, concurrent validity, and gender differences in 513 individuals from the Italian
community. Factor structure and construct validity were tested through Confirmatory Factor
Analysis, internal consistency through Cronbach’s alpha, concurrent validity through correlations with gambling-related cognitions (GRCS-I), probable pathological gambling (SOGS-I),
and gambling functioning (GFA-R-I). Results confirmed that the 6 items of the GUS-I load
highly on one dimension of Gambling Urge, and each of the 26 items of the GRSEQ-I load
highly on their relevant sub-dimension, among the following: situations/thoughts, drugs,
positive emotions, negative emotions. Both scales are internally consistent and show concurrent validity with gambling-related cognitions, probable pathological gambling, and gambling
functioning. Males score higher than females at the GUS-I; females score higher than males at
the GRSEQ-I. The findings from the present study suggest that the GUS-I and the GRSEQ-I
are internally consistent and valid scales for the assessment of gambling urges and gambling
refusal self-efficacy in Italian individuals from the community, with significant repercussions
in terms of assessment, prevention, and intervention.
Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Mental Health and Addiction
Early online date10 Dec 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 10 Dec 2019

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gambling
psychometrics
self-efficacy
questionnaire
cognition
emotion

Bibliographical note

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.

Cite this

Iliceto, Paolo ; Fino, Emanuele ; Schiavella, Mauro ; Po Oei, Tian. / Psychometric properties of the Italian Versions of the Gambling Urge Scale (GUS) and the Gambling Refusal Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (GRSEQ). In: International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction. 2019.
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abstract = "Gambling urges and gambling refusal self-efficacy beliefs play a major role in the development and maintenance of problem gambling. This study aimed to translate the Gambling UrgeScale (GUS) and the Gambling Refusal Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (GRSEQ) from English toItalian (GUS-I, GRSEQ-I) and to test their factor structure, internal consistency, constructvalidity, concurrent validity, and gender differences in 513 individuals from the Italiancommunity. Factor structure and construct validity were tested through Confirmatory FactorAnalysis, internal consistency through Cronbach’s alpha, concurrent validity through correlations with gambling-related cognitions (GRCS-I), probable pathological gambling (SOGS-I),and gambling functioning (GFA-R-I). Results confirmed that the 6 items of the GUS-I loadhighly on one dimension of Gambling Urge, and each of the 26 items of the GRSEQ-I loadhighly on their relevant sub-dimension, among the following: situations/thoughts, drugs,positive emotions, negative emotions. Both scales are internally consistent and show concurrent validity with gambling-related cognitions, probable pathological gambling, and gamblingfunctioning. Males score higher than females at the GUS-I; females score higher than males atthe GRSEQ-I. The findings from the present study suggest that the GUS-I and the GRSEQ-Iare internally consistent and valid scales for the assessment of gambling urges and gamblingrefusal self-efficacy in Italian individuals from the community, with significant repercussionsin terms of assessment, prevention, and intervention.",
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Psychometric properties of the Italian Versions of the Gambling Urge Scale (GUS) and the Gambling Refusal Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (GRSEQ). / Iliceto, Paolo; Fino, Emanuele; Schiavella, Mauro; Po Oei, Tian.

In: International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction, 10.12.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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