Quantifying sway through surface deflection patterns: a novel approach using distributive tactile sensing

M.T. Elliott, I. Petra, X.-H. Ma*, P.N. Brett, D.J. Holding

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This paper describes an experiment that extends the distributive sensing approach to identify the three-dimensional location of an object in constant motion. Distributive sensing has previously been successful in the identification of size and location of statically placed objects. Here, a novel system is developed to measure balance or sway in patients. The experimental set-up consisted of a pendulum structure positioned on a supported steel plate. Three low-cost deflection sensors were positioned under the plate with the resulting signals used as inputs to a neural network implemented on a field-programmable gate array. The results show that the embedded system can accurately track the pendulum position in real time with a mean tracking error of around 6 per cent in all three dimensions. This evidence indicates that the technique is sufficiently sensitive and could be implemented in a pragmatic configuration for discriminating between balance and sway.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)903-911
Number of pages9
JournalProceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part H: Journal of Engineering in Medicine
Volume223
Issue number7
Early online date9 Jul 2009
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2009

Fingerprint

Steel
Touch
Pendulums
Costs and Cost Analysis
Embedded systems
Field programmable gate arrays (FPGA)
Neural networks
Sensors
Costs
Experiments

Keywords

  • balance
  • distributive tactile sensing
  • neural networks
  • pendulum

Cite this

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Quantifying sway through surface deflection patterns : a novel approach using distributive tactile sensing. / Elliott, M.T.; Petra, I.; Ma, X.-H.; Brett, P.N.; Holding, D.J.

In: Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part H: Journal of Engineering in Medicine, Vol. 223, No. 7, 01.10.2009, p. 903-911.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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