Raising the “Table Stakes”? Ethnic Minority Businesses and Supply Chain Relationships

Monder Ram, K Woldesenbet, Trevor Jones

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article examines the experiences of small ethnic minority-owned businesses (EMBs) engaged in supply chain relationships with large purchasing organizations (LPOs). Working with the complementary frameworks of Edwards et al. (2006) and Kloosterman et al. (1999), we assess the effects on the internal dynamics of EMB firms of a move into the LPO supply chain. Drawing on case study evidence from three sectors – business services, information and communication technology (ICT) and food manufacture - we focus on the experiences of workers, who have been neglected in extant debates. We find that move to supply LPOs is extremely challenging for EMBs. Although workers express satisfaction with working relationships, the power of LPOs contributes to a tightening of control over practices like recruitment, work organization and work hours.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)309-326
Number of pages17
JournalWork, Employment and Society
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2011

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national minority
supply
worker
business service
work organization
communication technology
experience
information technology
food
firm
Ethnic minorities
Supply chain relationships
Purchasing
evidence
Workers

Cite this

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Raising the “Table Stakes”? Ethnic Minority Businesses and Supply Chain Relationships. / Ram, Monder; Woldesenbet, K; Jones, Trevor.

In: Work, Employment and Society, Vol. 25, No. 2, 01.06.2011, p. 309-326.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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