Regulation of G protein-coupled receptors by palmitoylation and cholesterol

Alan D. Goddard, Anthony Watts

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

Abstract

Due to their membrane location, G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are subject to regulation by soluble and integral membrane proteins as well as membrane components, including lipids and sterols. GPCRs also undergo a variety of post-translational modifications, including palmitoylation. A recent article by Zheng et al. in BMC Cell Biology demonstrates cooperative roles for receptor palmitoylation and cholesterol binding in GPCR dimerization and G protein coupling, underlining the complex regulation of these receptors.See research article http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2121/13/6.

Original languageEnglish
Article number27
Number of pages3
JournalBMC Biology
Volume10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 19 Mar 2012

Fingerprint

Lipoylation
G-Protein-Coupled Receptors
Cholesterol
cholesterol
protein
Cytology
Membranes
membrane
receptors
dimerization
Dimerization
post-translational modification
Sterols
Post Translational Protein Processing
G-proteins
GTP-Binding Proteins
membrane proteins
cell biology
sterols
cooperatives

Bibliographical note

© 2012 Goddard and Watts; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Cite this

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Regulation of G protein-coupled receptors by palmitoylation and cholesterol. / Goddard, Alan D.; Watts, Anthony.

In: BMC Biology, Vol. 10, 27, 19.03.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

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T1 - Regulation of G protein-coupled receptors by palmitoylation and cholesterol

AU - Goddard, Alan D.

AU - Watts, Anthony

N1 - © 2012 Goddard and Watts; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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