Relevance of motion artifact in electromyography recordings during vibration treatment

Antonio Fratini, Mario Cesarelli*, Paolo Bifulco, Maria Romano

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Electromyography readings (EMGs) from quadriceps of fifteen subjects were recorded during whole body vibration treatment at different frequencies (10-50 Hz). Additional electrodes were placed on the patella to monitor the occurrence of motion artifact, triaxial accelerometers were placed onto quadriceps to monitor motion. Signal spectra revealed sharp peaks corresponding to vibration frequency and its harmonics, in accordance with the accelerometer data. EMG total power was compared to that associated with vibration harmonics narrow bands, before and during vibration. On average, vibration associated power resulted in only 3% (±0.9%) of the total power prior to vibration and 29% (±13.4%) during vibration. Often, studies employ surface EMG to quantitatively evaluate vibration evoked muscular activity and to set stimulation frequency. However, previous research has not accounted for motion artifacts. The data presented in this study emphasize the need for the removal of motion artifacts, as they consistently affect RMS estimation, which is often used as a concise muscle activity index during vibrations. Such artifacts, rather unpredictable in amplitude, might be the cause of large inter-study differences and must be eliminated before analysis. Motion artifact filtering will contribute to thorough and precise interpretation of neuromuscular response to vibration treatment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)710-718
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Electromyography and Kinesiology
Volume19
Issue number4
Early online date20 May 2008
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2009

Fingerprint

Electromyography
Vibration
Artifacts
Patella
Reading
Electrodes
Muscles

Keywords

  • electromyography
  • motion artifact
  • vibration treatment
  • whole body vibration

Cite this

Fratini, Antonio ; Cesarelli, Mario ; Bifulco, Paolo ; Romano, Maria. / Relevance of motion artifact in electromyography recordings during vibration treatment. In: Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology. 2009 ; Vol. 19, No. 4. pp. 710-718.
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Relevance of motion artifact in electromyography recordings during vibration treatment. / Fratini, Antonio; Cesarelli, Mario; Bifulco, Paolo; Romano, Maria.

In: Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology, Vol. 19, No. 4, 08.2009, p. 710-718.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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