Role of CCR5 in learning and memory and in HIV V3 peptide induced cognitive deficits

M. Zhou, S. Greenhill, S. Huang, T. Silva, Y. Sano, S. Wu, Y. Cai, Y. Nagaoka, M. Sehgal, D. Cai, Y.-S. Lee, K. Fox, A.J. Silva

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

Abstract

Cognitive deficits are a significant clinical problem associated with HIV infection. Although the role of CCR5 in immunity and in HIV infection has been studied widely, its role in neuronal plasticity, learning and memory, and in HIV-associated cognitive deficits is not well understood. In a reverse genetic screen, we found that a Ccr5 null mutation results in hippocampus-dependent memory enhancements. Molecular and cellular studies indicated that the memory enhancement is caused by increases in MAPK/CREB signaling and enhanced long-term potentiation (LTP). Ccr5 knockdown in the hippocampus of adult mice also led to enhancements in hippocampal memory, thus confirming a role for this receptor in adult plasticity and memory. These results suggest that besides its role as a co-receptor for HIV, CCR5 is a powerful suppressor for learning and memory, and that CCR5 over-activation by viral peptides may contribute to HIV-associated cognitive deficits. Consistent with this hypothesis, the HIV V3 loop peptide, known to bind and activate CCR5, caused deficits both in signaling implicated in learning and memory (hippocampal MAPK activation) and in a key cellular mechanism for learning and memory (LTP). Accordingly, acute hippocampal injection of V3 peptide also caused memory deficits. Importantly, V3 peptide induced signaling, LTP and memory deficits were prevented by a Ccr5 knockout. Overall, our results demonstrate that CCR5 plays an important role in plasticity and memory, and CCR5 over-activation may contribute to the cognitive deficits caused by HIV coat proteins.
Original languageEnglish
Pages177.10 / HHH40
Publication statusPublished - 13 Nov 2016
EventNeuroscience 2016: Society for Neuroscience Annual Meeting 2016 - San Diego Convention Center, San Diego, CA, United States
Duration: 12 Nov 201616 Nov 2016
https://www.sfn.org/annual-meeting/neuroscience-2016

Conference

ConferenceNeuroscience 2016
Abbreviated titleSfN 2016
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego, CA
Period12/11/1616/11/16
Internet address

Fingerprint

Learning
Long-Term Potentiation
Memory Disorders
Peptides
HIV Infections
Hippocampus
HIV Receptors
CCR5 Receptors
HIV
Human Immunodeficiency Virus Proteins
HIV envelope protein gp120 (305-321)
Reverse Genetics
Virus Activation
Neuronal Plasticity
Long-Term Memory
Capsid Proteins
Immunity
Mutation
Injections

Keywords

  • neuroscience
  • plasticity

Cite this

Zhou, M., Greenhill, S., Huang, S., Silva, T., Sano, Y., Wu, S., ... Silva, A. J. (2016). Role of CCR5 in learning and memory and in HIV V3 peptide induced cognitive deficits. 177.10 / HHH40. Poster session presented at Neuroscience 2016, San Diego, CA, United States.
Zhou, M. ; Greenhill, S. ; Huang, S. ; Silva, T. ; Sano, Y. ; Wu, S. ; Cai, Y. ; Nagaoka, Y. ; Sehgal, M. ; Cai, D. ; Lee, Y.-S. ; Fox, K. ; Silva, A.J. / Role of CCR5 in learning and memory and in HIV V3 peptide induced cognitive deficits. Poster session presented at Neuroscience 2016, San Diego, CA, United States.
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abstract = "Cognitive deficits are a significant clinical problem associated with HIV infection. Although the role of CCR5 in immunity and in HIV infection has been studied widely, its role in neuronal plasticity, learning and memory, and in HIV-associated cognitive deficits is not well understood. In a reverse genetic screen, we found that a Ccr5 null mutation results in hippocampus-dependent memory enhancements. Molecular and cellular studies indicated that the memory enhancement is caused by increases in MAPK/CREB signaling and enhanced long-term potentiation (LTP). Ccr5 knockdown in the hippocampus of adult mice also led to enhancements in hippocampal memory, thus confirming a role for this receptor in adult plasticity and memory. These results suggest that besides its role as a co-receptor for HIV, CCR5 is a powerful suppressor for learning and memory, and that CCR5 over-activation by viral peptides may contribute to HIV-associated cognitive deficits. Consistent with this hypothesis, the HIV V3 loop peptide, known to bind and activate CCR5, caused deficits both in signaling implicated in learning and memory (hippocampal MAPK activation) and in a key cellular mechanism for learning and memory (LTP). Accordingly, acute hippocampal injection of V3 peptide also caused memory deficits. Importantly, V3 peptide induced signaling, LTP and memory deficits were prevented by a Ccr5 knockout. Overall, our results demonstrate that CCR5 plays an important role in plasticity and memory, and CCR5 over-activation may contribute to the cognitive deficits caused by HIV coat proteins.",
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Zhou, M, Greenhill, S, Huang, S, Silva, T, Sano, Y, Wu, S, Cai, Y, Nagaoka, Y, Sehgal, M, Cai, D, Lee, Y-S, Fox, K & Silva, AJ 2016, 'Role of CCR5 in learning and memory and in HIV V3 peptide induced cognitive deficits' Neuroscience 2016, San Diego, CA, United States, 12/11/16 - 16/11/16, pp. 177.10 / HHH40.

Role of CCR5 in learning and memory and in HIV V3 peptide induced cognitive deficits. / Zhou, M.; Greenhill, S.; Huang, S.; Silva, T.; Sano, Y.; Wu, S.; Cai, Y.; Nagaoka, Y.; Sehgal, M.; Cai, D.; Lee, Y.-S.; Fox, K.; Silva, A.J.

2016. 177.10 / HHH40 Poster session presented at Neuroscience 2016, San Diego, CA, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

TY - CONF

T1 - Role of CCR5 in learning and memory and in HIV V3 peptide induced cognitive deficits

AU - Zhou, M.

AU - Greenhill, S.

AU - Huang, S.

AU - Silva, T.

AU - Sano, Y.

AU - Wu, S.

AU - Cai, Y.

AU - Nagaoka, Y.

AU - Sehgal, M.

AU - Cai, D.

AU - Lee, Y.-S.

AU - Fox, K.

AU - Silva, A.J.

PY - 2016/11/13

Y1 - 2016/11/13

N2 - Cognitive deficits are a significant clinical problem associated with HIV infection. Although the role of CCR5 in immunity and in HIV infection has been studied widely, its role in neuronal plasticity, learning and memory, and in HIV-associated cognitive deficits is not well understood. In a reverse genetic screen, we found that a Ccr5 null mutation results in hippocampus-dependent memory enhancements. Molecular and cellular studies indicated that the memory enhancement is caused by increases in MAPK/CREB signaling and enhanced long-term potentiation (LTP). Ccr5 knockdown in the hippocampus of adult mice also led to enhancements in hippocampal memory, thus confirming a role for this receptor in adult plasticity and memory. These results suggest that besides its role as a co-receptor for HIV, CCR5 is a powerful suppressor for learning and memory, and that CCR5 over-activation by viral peptides may contribute to HIV-associated cognitive deficits. Consistent with this hypothesis, the HIV V3 loop peptide, known to bind and activate CCR5, caused deficits both in signaling implicated in learning and memory (hippocampal MAPK activation) and in a key cellular mechanism for learning and memory (LTP). Accordingly, acute hippocampal injection of V3 peptide also caused memory deficits. Importantly, V3 peptide induced signaling, LTP and memory deficits were prevented by a Ccr5 knockout. Overall, our results demonstrate that CCR5 plays an important role in plasticity and memory, and CCR5 over-activation may contribute to the cognitive deficits caused by HIV coat proteins.

AB - Cognitive deficits are a significant clinical problem associated with HIV infection. Although the role of CCR5 in immunity and in HIV infection has been studied widely, its role in neuronal plasticity, learning and memory, and in HIV-associated cognitive deficits is not well understood. In a reverse genetic screen, we found that a Ccr5 null mutation results in hippocampus-dependent memory enhancements. Molecular and cellular studies indicated that the memory enhancement is caused by increases in MAPK/CREB signaling and enhanced long-term potentiation (LTP). Ccr5 knockdown in the hippocampus of adult mice also led to enhancements in hippocampal memory, thus confirming a role for this receptor in adult plasticity and memory. These results suggest that besides its role as a co-receptor for HIV, CCR5 is a powerful suppressor for learning and memory, and that CCR5 over-activation by viral peptides may contribute to HIV-associated cognitive deficits. Consistent with this hypothesis, the HIV V3 loop peptide, known to bind and activate CCR5, caused deficits both in signaling implicated in learning and memory (hippocampal MAPK activation) and in a key cellular mechanism for learning and memory (LTP). Accordingly, acute hippocampal injection of V3 peptide also caused memory deficits. Importantly, V3 peptide induced signaling, LTP and memory deficits were prevented by a Ccr5 knockout. Overall, our results demonstrate that CCR5 plays an important role in plasticity and memory, and CCR5 over-activation may contribute to the cognitive deficits caused by HIV coat proteins.

KW - neuroscience

KW - plasticity

M3 - Poster

SP - 177.10 / HHH40

ER -

Zhou M, Greenhill S, Huang S, Silva T, Sano Y, Wu S et al. Role of CCR5 in learning and memory and in HIV V3 peptide induced cognitive deficits. 2016. Poster session presented at Neuroscience 2016, San Diego, CA, United States.