Service acculturation: a dyadic study of managerial and employee effects upon service firm performance

Andrew M. Farrell, Anne L. Souchon

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

The majority of previous research into service quality and services marketing has concentrated upon the measurement of service quality outcomes, rather than the enhancement of the process by which service is delivered. In this study a conceptual model of the service acculturation process is proposed, modelling the input of service managers and employees in the delivery of service quality to customers. The conceptualisation is then empirically tested utilising a dyadic study of the New Zealand hotel industry. Results indicate that 1) a strong commitment to service is important for both managers and employees; and 2) that employees’ teamwork may have an adverse effect on perceived quality of customer service. Implications of the results and future research directions are subsequently discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2003
EventAustralia and New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference 2003 - Adelaide, Australia
Duration: 1 Dec 20033 Dec 2003

Conference

ConferenceAustralia and New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference 2003
Abbreviated titleANZMAC 2003
CountryAustralia
CityAdelaide
Period1/12/033/12/03

Keywords

  • service behaviours
  • service quality
  • service commitment
  • firm performance

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  • Research Output

    The service leadership scale: a substantive validity test

    Farrell, A. M. & Souchon, A. L., 2003.

    Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

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  • Cite this

    Farrell, A. M., & Souchon, A. L. (2003). Service acculturation: a dyadic study of managerial and employee effects upon service firm performance. Paper presented at Australia and New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference 2003, Adelaide, Australia.