Should I stay or should I go? Explaining turnover intentions with organizational identification and job satisfaction

Rolf van Dick*, Oliver Christ, Jost Stellmacher, Ulrich Wagner, Oliver Ahlswede, Cornelia Grubba, Martin Hauptmeier, Corinna Höhfeldt, Kai Moltzen, Patrick A. Tissington

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The social identity approach is a powerful theoretical framework for the understanding of individuals behaviour. The main argument is that individuals think and act on behalf of the group they belong to because this group membership adds to their social identity, which partly determines ones self-esteem. In the organizational world, social identity and self-categorization theories state that a strong organizational identification is associated with low turnover intentions. Because identification is the more general perception of shared fate between employee and organization, we propose that the relationship between identification and turnover will be mediated by job satisfaction as the more specific evaluation of ones task and working conditions. In four samples we found organizational identification feeding into job satisfaction, which in turn predicts turnover intentions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)351-360
Number of pages10
JournalBritish Journal of Management
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2004

Keywords

  • social identity approach
  • individuals' behaviour
  • group membership
  • social identity
  • self-esteem
  • self-categorization
  • organizational identification
  • low turnover intentions
  • identification
  • turnover
  • job satisfaction
  • task
  • working conditions

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