Sleep disruption and domestic violence: exploring the interconnections between mothers and children

Pam K. Lowe, Cathy Humphreys, Simon J. Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This paper argues that sleep disruption is both a strategy and an effect of violence and abuse which profoundly affects the lives of women and children. This paper traces the interconnections between the patterns of sleeping (not sleeping) for women and children living with and recovering from the effects of violence and abuse. It highlights the threat to the emotional and physical well-being of children and women and provides a non-pathologizing route into an exploration of one of the symptoms of trauma. It is based on a pilot study which interviewed 17 women, 14 of whom were mothers to 28 children. Mothers reported that many of their children experienced nightmares, bed-wetting, night panics and disrupted sleep patterns. Recovery of the ability to sleep was often slow and uneven with interactive effects between women and children slowing progress.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)6-14
Number of pages9
JournalChild and Family Social Work
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 9 Sep 2009

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Domestic Violence
interconnection
sleep
domestic violence
Sleep
Mothers
Violence
abuse
violence
behavior disorder
Panic
Aptitude
trauma
well-being
threat
Wounds and Injuries
ability

Keywords

  • domestic violence
  • mother–child relationship
  • sleep
  • trauma

Cite this

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Sleep disruption and domestic violence: exploring the interconnections between mothers and children. / Lowe, Pam K.; Humphreys, Cathy; Williams, Simon J.

In: Child and Family Social Work, Vol. 14, No. 1, 09.09.2009, p. 6-14.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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