Sparkling fountains or stagnant ponds: An integrative model of creativity and innovation implementation in work groups

Michael A. West*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In this article I synthesise research and theory that advance our understanding of creativity and innovation implementation in groups at work. It is suggested that creativity occurs primarily at the early stages of innovation processes with innovation implementation later. The influences of task characteristics, group knowledge diversity and skill, external demands, integrating group processes and intragroup safety are explored. Creativity, it is proposed, is hindered whereas perceived threat, uncertainty or other high levels of demands aid the implementation of innovation. Diversity of knowledge and skills is a powerful predictor of innovation, but integrating group processes and competencies are needed to enable the fruits of this diversity to be harvested. The implications for theory and practice are also explored.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)355-387
Number of pages33
JournalApplied Psychology
Volume51
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2002

Fingerprint

Creativity
Group Processes
Uncertainty
Fruit
Safety
Research
Fountain
Innovation

Cite this

@article{3d89902ca4c145c68123c2f804642f73,
title = "Sparkling fountains or stagnant ponds: An integrative model of creativity and innovation implementation in work groups",
abstract = "In this article I synthesise research and theory that advance our understanding of creativity and innovation implementation in groups at work. It is suggested that creativity occurs primarily at the early stages of innovation processes with innovation implementation later. The influences of task characteristics, group knowledge diversity and skill, external demands, integrating group processes and intragroup safety are explored. Creativity, it is proposed, is hindered whereas perceived threat, uncertainty or other high levels of demands aid the implementation of innovation. Diversity of knowledge and skills is a powerful predictor of innovation, but integrating group processes and competencies are needed to enable the fruits of this diversity to be harvested. The implications for theory and practice are also explored.",
author = "West, {Michael A.}",
year = "2002",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1111/1464-0597.00951",
language = "English",
volume = "51",
pages = "355--387",
journal = "Applied Psychology",
issn = "0269-994X",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "3",

}

Sparkling fountains or stagnant ponds : An integrative model of creativity and innovation implementation in work groups. / West, Michael A.

In: Applied Psychology, Vol. 51, No. 3, 07.2002, p. 355-387.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Sparkling fountains or stagnant ponds

T2 - An integrative model of creativity and innovation implementation in work groups

AU - West, Michael A.

PY - 2002/7

Y1 - 2002/7

N2 - In this article I synthesise research and theory that advance our understanding of creativity and innovation implementation in groups at work. It is suggested that creativity occurs primarily at the early stages of innovation processes with innovation implementation later. The influences of task characteristics, group knowledge diversity and skill, external demands, integrating group processes and intragroup safety are explored. Creativity, it is proposed, is hindered whereas perceived threat, uncertainty or other high levels of demands aid the implementation of innovation. Diversity of knowledge and skills is a powerful predictor of innovation, but integrating group processes and competencies are needed to enable the fruits of this diversity to be harvested. The implications for theory and practice are also explored.

AB - In this article I synthesise research and theory that advance our understanding of creativity and innovation implementation in groups at work. It is suggested that creativity occurs primarily at the early stages of innovation processes with innovation implementation later. The influences of task characteristics, group knowledge diversity and skill, external demands, integrating group processes and intragroup safety are explored. Creativity, it is proposed, is hindered whereas perceived threat, uncertainty or other high levels of demands aid the implementation of innovation. Diversity of knowledge and skills is a powerful predictor of innovation, but integrating group processes and competencies are needed to enable the fruits of this diversity to be harvested. The implications for theory and practice are also explored.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036661232&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1464-0597.00951/abstract

U2 - 10.1111/1464-0597.00951

DO - 10.1111/1464-0597.00951

M3 - Article

VL - 51

SP - 355

EP - 387

JO - Applied Psychology

JF - Applied Psychology

SN - 0269-994X

IS - 3

ER -