Stream biasing by different induction sequences: Evaluating stream capture as an account of the segregation-promoting effects of constant-frequency inducers

Saima L. Rajasingam, Robert J. Summers, Brian Roberts

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Stream segregation for a test sequence comprising high-frequency (H) and low-frequency (L) pure
tones, presented in a galloping rhythm, is much greater when preceded by a constant-frequency induction
sequence matching one subset than by an inducer configured like the test sequence; this difference
persists for several seconds. It has been proposed that constant-frequency inducers promote stream segregation
by capturing the matching subset of test-sequence tones into an on-going, pre-established
stream. This explanation was evaluated using 2-s induction sequences followed by longer test sequences
(12–20 s). Listeners reported the number of streams heard throughout the test sequence.
Experiment 1 used LHL– sequences and one or other subset of inducer tones was attenuated (0–24 dB
in 6-dB steps, and 1). Greater attenuation usually caused a progressive increase in segregation,
towards that following the constant-frequency inducer. Experiment 2 used HLH– sequences and the L
inducer tones were raised or lowered in frequency relative to their test-sequence counterparts (DfI¼ 0,
0.5, 1.0, or 1.5 DfT). Either change greatly increased segregation. These results are concordant with
the notion of attention switching to new sounds but contradict the stream-capture hypothesis, unless a
“proto-object” corresponding to the continuing subset is assumed to form during the induction
sequence.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3409-3420
JournalJournal of the Acoustical Society of America
Volume144
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 Dec 2018

Fingerprint

induction
set theory
rhythm
Induction
Segregation
attenuation
low frequencies
acoustics

Bibliographical note

© 2018 Author(s). All article content, except where otherwise noted, is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

Cite this

@article{18a930007a29495f91c8e72a908c1bff,
title = "Stream biasing by different induction sequences: Evaluating stream capture as an account of the segregation-promoting effects of constant-frequency inducers",
abstract = "Stream segregation for a test sequence comprising high-frequency (H) and low-frequency (L) puretones, presented in a galloping rhythm, is much greater when preceded by a constant-frequency inductionsequence matching one subset than by an inducer configured like the test sequence; this differencepersists for several seconds. It has been proposed that constant-frequency inducers promote stream segregationby capturing the matching subset of test-sequence tones into an on-going, pre-establishedstream. This explanation was evaluated using 2-s induction sequences followed by longer test sequences(12–20 s). Listeners reported the number of streams heard throughout the test sequence.Experiment 1 used LHL– sequences and one or other subset of inducer tones was attenuated (0–24 dBin 6-dB steps, and 1). Greater attenuation usually caused a progressive increase in segregation,towards that following the constant-frequency inducer. Experiment 2 used HLH– sequences and the Linducer tones were raised or lowered in frequency relative to their test-sequence counterparts (DfI¼ 0,0.5, 1.0, or 1.5 DfT). Either change greatly increased segregation. These results are concordant withthe notion of attention switching to new sounds but contradict the stream-capture hypothesis, unless a“proto-object” corresponding to the continuing subset is assumed to form during the inductionsequence.",
author = "Rajasingam, {Saima L.} and Summers, {Robert J.} and Brian Roberts",
note = "{\circledC} 2018 Author(s). All article content, except where otherwise noted, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).",
year = "2018",
month = "12",
day = "20",
doi = "10.1121/1.5082300",
language = "English",
volume = "144",
pages = "3409--3420",
journal = "Journal of the Acoustical Society of America",
issn = "0001-4966",
publisher = "Acoustical Society of America",
number = "6",

}

Stream biasing by different induction sequences: Evaluating stream capture as an account of the segregation-promoting effects of constant-frequency inducers. / Rajasingam, Saima L.; Summers, Robert J.; Roberts, Brian.

In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 144, No. 6, 20.12.2018, p. 3409-3420.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Stream biasing by different induction sequences: Evaluating stream capture as an account of the segregation-promoting effects of constant-frequency inducers

AU - Rajasingam, Saima L.

AU - Summers, Robert J.

AU - Roberts, Brian

N1 - © 2018 Author(s). All article content, except where otherwise noted, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

PY - 2018/12/20

Y1 - 2018/12/20

N2 - Stream segregation for a test sequence comprising high-frequency (H) and low-frequency (L) puretones, presented in a galloping rhythm, is much greater when preceded by a constant-frequency inductionsequence matching one subset than by an inducer configured like the test sequence; this differencepersists for several seconds. It has been proposed that constant-frequency inducers promote stream segregationby capturing the matching subset of test-sequence tones into an on-going, pre-establishedstream. This explanation was evaluated using 2-s induction sequences followed by longer test sequences(12–20 s). Listeners reported the number of streams heard throughout the test sequence.Experiment 1 used LHL– sequences and one or other subset of inducer tones was attenuated (0–24 dBin 6-dB steps, and 1). Greater attenuation usually caused a progressive increase in segregation,towards that following the constant-frequency inducer. Experiment 2 used HLH– sequences and the Linducer tones were raised or lowered in frequency relative to their test-sequence counterparts (DfI¼ 0,0.5, 1.0, or 1.5 DfT). Either change greatly increased segregation. These results are concordant withthe notion of attention switching to new sounds but contradict the stream-capture hypothesis, unless a“proto-object” corresponding to the continuing subset is assumed to form during the inductionsequence.

AB - Stream segregation for a test sequence comprising high-frequency (H) and low-frequency (L) puretones, presented in a galloping rhythm, is much greater when preceded by a constant-frequency inductionsequence matching one subset than by an inducer configured like the test sequence; this differencepersists for several seconds. It has been proposed that constant-frequency inducers promote stream segregationby capturing the matching subset of test-sequence tones into an on-going, pre-establishedstream. This explanation was evaluated using 2-s induction sequences followed by longer test sequences(12–20 s). Listeners reported the number of streams heard throughout the test sequence.Experiment 1 used LHL– sequences and one or other subset of inducer tones was attenuated (0–24 dBin 6-dB steps, and 1). Greater attenuation usually caused a progressive increase in segregation,towards that following the constant-frequency inducer. Experiment 2 used HLH– sequences and the Linducer tones were raised or lowered in frequency relative to their test-sequence counterparts (DfI¼ 0,0.5, 1.0, or 1.5 DfT). Either change greatly increased segregation. These results are concordant withthe notion of attention switching to new sounds but contradict the stream-capture hypothesis, unless a“proto-object” corresponding to the continuing subset is assumed to form during the inductionsequence.

UR - http://asa.scitation.org/doi/10.1121/1.5082300

UR - https://doi.org/10.17036/researchdata.aston.ac.uk.00000390

U2 - 10.1121/1.5082300

DO - 10.1121/1.5082300

M3 - Article

VL - 144

SP - 3409

EP - 3420

JO - Journal of the Acoustical Society of America

JF - Journal of the Acoustical Society of America

SN - 0001-4966

IS - 6

ER -