Telling the truth and shaming the devil: using Caribbean proverbial wisdom for raising the critical consciousness of African Caribbean people in postcolonial Britain

Anthony G. Reddie*

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    This article outlines a creative, innovative and interdisciplinary approach to conscientizing ordinary Black people on the margins of British society. This approach is one I have termed "participative" Black theology. It seeks to move beyond largely theorizing to that which enables ordinary people to be active in a more praxis-based approach to building theological discourse from the bottom up. This particular, participative approach to Black theology is one in which I engage with Jamaican proverbs, as a means of utilizing African Caribbean folk wisdom in order to create a practical resource for raising the critical consciousness of ordinary Black people. This practical schema for engaging with Caribbean proverbial wisdom is used as a means of engaging critically with the Bible, in order to develop a reading strategy that will lend itself to more subversive and improvisatory approaches to understanding Black life in Britain.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)41-58
    Number of pages18
    JournalBlack Theology
    Volume13
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Apr 2015

    Keywords

    • participative black theology
    • proverbial wisdom
    • socialpolitical engagement
    • wise sayings

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