Temperature effects on the mechanism of time independent hydrogen assisted fatigue crack propagation in steels

T.J. Marrow, P.J. Cotterill, J.E. King

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    The effects of temperature on hydrogen assisted fatigue crack propagation are investigated in three steels in the low-to-medium strength range; a low alloy structural steel, a super duplex stainless steel, and a super ferritic stainless steel. Significant enhancement of crack growth rates is observed in hydrogen gas at atmospheric pressure in all three materials. Failure occurs via a mechanism of time independent, transgranular, cyclic cleavage over a frequency range of 0.1-5 Hz. Increasing the temperature in hydrogen up to 80°C markedly reduces the degree of embrittlement in the structural and super ferritic steels. No such effect is observed in the duplex stainless steel until the temperature exceeds 120°C. The temperature response may be understood by considering the interaction between absorbed hydrogen and micro-structural traps, which are generated in the zone of intense plastic deformation ahead of the fatigue crack tip. © 1992.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)2059-2068
    Number of pages10
    JournalActa Metallurgica et Materialia
    Volume40
    Issue number8
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Aug 1992

    Keywords

    • crack propagation
    • fatigue of materials
    • Hydrogen embrittlement
    • stainless steel
    • hydrogen assisted fatigue crack propagation thermal effects
    • low alloy structural steel
    • super duplex stainless steel
    • super ferritic stainless steel

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