The competitive advantage of nations: origins and journey

Robert Huggins, Hiro Izushi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to provide an understanding of the origins and journey of the fundamental ideas underpinning Michael Porter’s The Competitive Advantage of Nations as a means of assessing its influence.
Design/methodology/approach – Drawing on a reflection of the book’s text and associated works by Porter, the paper shows how Porter’s thinking evolved from his earlier writings, as well as how his ideas went through further periods of development following the publication of The Competitive Advantage of Nations.
Findings – The paper focuses on the emergence of Porter’s cluster theory and his growing acknowledgement of the role of innovation within processes of economic development. It shows how these concepts have provided a foundation for contemporary economic development practices. Also, the paper highlights how the fundamental concepts of Porter’s text have shifted from a unit of analysis focused on nations to one where subnational regions are the primary analytical unit.
Originality/value – The paper concludes by suggesting that the nature of Porter’s conceptual insights is likely to ensure the long-term endurance of the fundamental lessons contained within The Competitive Advantage of Nations.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)458-470
Number of pages13
JournalCompetitiveness Review
Volume25
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Bibliographical note

This article is © Emerald Group Publishing and permission has been granted for this version to appear here http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/CR-06-2015-0044. Emerald does not grant permission for this article to be further copied/distributed or hosted elsewhere without the express permission from Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

Keywords

  • competitiveness
  • clusters
  • Porter

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