Abstract

Increased public awareness of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a key component of effective antimicrobial stewardship strategies. Educational theatre combined with an expert panel was used to engage the public about AMR through delivery of a play entitled 'The drugs don't work'. Audience knowledge and understanding of AMR were measured by pre- and post-play questionnaires. Performance of the play and discussion with the expert panel significantly improved audience knowledge and understanding of AMR, including antibiotic misuse and prescribing. Educational theatre provides a positive learning experience and is an innovative method of public engagement to disseminate important public health messages.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Hospital Infection
Early online date16 Oct 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 16 Oct 2019

Fingerprint

Public Opinion
Microbial Drug Resistance
Public Health
Learning
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Surveys and Questionnaires

Bibliographical note

© Crown Copyright. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Keywords

  • Educational theatre
  • antimicrobial resistance
  • health education
  • public engagement

Cite this

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title = "The drugs don't work: evaluation of educational theatre to gauge and influence public opinion on antimicrobial resistance",
abstract = "Increased public awareness of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a key component of effective antimicrobial stewardship strategies. Educational theatre combined with an expert panel was used to engage the public about AMR through delivery of a play entitled 'The drugs don't work'. Audience knowledge and understanding of AMR were measured by pre- and post-play questionnaires. Performance of the play and discussion with the expert panel significantly improved audience knowledge and understanding of AMR, including antibiotic misuse and prescribing. Educational theatre provides a positive learning experience and is an innovative method of public engagement to disseminate important public health messages.",
keywords = "Educational theatre, antimicrobial resistance, health education, public engagement",
author = "Rabia Ahmed and Amreen Bashir and Brown, {James E P} and Cox, {Jonathan A G} and Hilton, {Anthony C} and Hilton, {Charlotte E} and Lambert, {Peter A} and Eirini Theodosiou and Tritter, {Jonathan Q} and Watkin, {Samuel J} and Tony Worthington",
note = "{\circledC} Crown Copyright. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/",
year = "2019",
month = "10",
day = "16",
doi = "10.1016/j.jhin.2019.10.011",
language = "English",
journal = "Journal of Hospital Infection",
issn = "0195-6701",
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AU - Ahmed, Rabia

AU - Bashir, Amreen

AU - Brown, James E P

AU - Cox, Jonathan A G

AU - Hilton, Anthony C

AU - Hilton, Charlotte E

AU - Lambert, Peter A

AU - Theodosiou, Eirini

AU - Tritter, Jonathan Q

AU - Watkin, Samuel J

AU - Worthington, Tony

N1 - © Crown Copyright. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

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N2 - Increased public awareness of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a key component of effective antimicrobial stewardship strategies. Educational theatre combined with an expert panel was used to engage the public about AMR through delivery of a play entitled 'The drugs don't work'. Audience knowledge and understanding of AMR were measured by pre- and post-play questionnaires. Performance of the play and discussion with the expert panel significantly improved audience knowledge and understanding of AMR, including antibiotic misuse and prescribing. Educational theatre provides a positive learning experience and is an innovative method of public engagement to disseminate important public health messages.

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KW - health education

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