The effect of social influence and curfews on civil violence

Michael Garlick, Maria Chli

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

We investigate the policies of (1) restricting social influence and (2) imposing curfews upon interacting citizens in a community. We compare their effects on the social order and the emerging levels of civil violence. We develop an agent-based model that is used to simulate a community of citizens and the police force that guards it. We find that restricting social influence pacifies rebellious societies, but has the opposite effect on peaceful ones. Curfews exhibit a pacifying effect across all types of society.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the International Joint Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multiagent Systems, AAMAS
PublisherIFAAMAS
Pages1335-1336
Number of pages2
Volume2
ISBN (Print)978-0-9817381-7-8
Publication statusPublished - 10 May 2009
Event8th International Joint Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multiagent Systems 2009, AAMAS 2009 - Budapest, United Kingdom
Duration: 10 May 200915 May 2009

Conference

Conference8th International Joint Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multiagent Systems 2009, AAMAS 2009
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityBudapest
Period10/05/0915/05/09

Fingerprint

Law enforcement
Violence

Keywords

  • Description level: experimental/empirical
  • Environment (environment modelling and simulation)
  • Focus: comprehensive/cross-cutting (multi-agent based simulation)
  • Inspiration source: social sciences
  • Simulations
  • Social/organisational (groups and teams emergent behaviour)

Cite this

Garlick, M., & Chli, M. (2009). The effect of social influence and curfews on civil violence. In Proceedings of the International Joint Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multiagent Systems, AAMAS (Vol. 2, pp. 1335-1336). IFAAMAS.
Garlick, Michael ; Chli, Maria. / The effect of social influence and curfews on civil violence. Proceedings of the International Joint Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multiagent Systems, AAMAS. Vol. 2 IFAAMAS, 2009. pp. 1335-1336
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Garlick, M & Chli, M 2009, The effect of social influence and curfews on civil violence. in Proceedings of the International Joint Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multiagent Systems, AAMAS. vol. 2, IFAAMAS, pp. 1335-1336, 8th International Joint Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multiagent Systems 2009, AAMAS 2009, Budapest, United Kingdom, 10/05/09.

The effect of social influence and curfews on civil violence. / Garlick, Michael; Chli, Maria.

Proceedings of the International Joint Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multiagent Systems, AAMAS. Vol. 2 IFAAMAS, 2009. p. 1335-1336.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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KW - Environment (environment modelling and simulation)

KW - Focus: comprehensive/cross-cutting (multi-agent based simulation)

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KW - Simulations

KW - Social/organisational (groups and teams emergent behaviour)

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Garlick M, Chli M. The effect of social influence and curfews on civil violence. In Proceedings of the International Joint Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multiagent Systems, AAMAS. Vol. 2. IFAAMAS. 2009. p. 1335-1336