The Effects of Previous Error and Success in Alzheimer’s Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment

T. J. Crawford*, S. Taylor, D. Mardanbegi, M. Polden, T. W. Wilcockson, R. Killick, P. Sawyer, H. Gellersen, I. Leroi

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This work investigated in Alzheimer’s disease dementia (AD), whether the probability of making an error on a task (or a correct response) was influenced by the outcome of the previous trials. We used the antisaccade task (AST) as a model task given the emerging consensus that it provides a promising sensitive and early biological test of cognitive impairment in AD. It can be employed equally well in healthy young and old adults, and in clinical populations. This study examined eye-movements in a sample of 202 participants (42 with dementia due to AD; 65 with mild cognitive impairment (MCI); 95 control participants). The findings revealed an overall increase in the frequency of AST errors in AD and MCI compared to the control group, as predicted. The errors on the current trial increased in proportion to the number of consecutive errors on the previous trials. Interestingly, the probability of errors was reduced on the trials that followed a previously corrected error, compared to the trials where the error remained uncorrected, revealing a level of adaptive control in participants with MCI or AD dementia. There was an earlier peak in the AST distribution of the saccadic reaction times for the inhibitory errors in comparison to the correct saccades. These findings revealed that the inhibitory errors of the past have a negative effect on the future performance of healthy adults as well as people with a neurodegenerative cognitive impairment.

Original languageEnglish
Article number20204
JournalScientific Reports
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27 Dec 2019

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    Crawford, T. J., Taylor, S., Mardanbegi, D., Polden, M., Wilcockson, T. W., Killick, R., Sawyer, P., Gellersen, H., & Leroi, I. (2019). The Effects of Previous Error and Success in Alzheimer’s Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment. Scientific Reports, 9(1), [20204]. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-56625-2