The importance of power dynamics in the development of asynchronous online learning communities

Panagiotis Vlachopoulos

Research output: Chapter in Book/Published conference outputConference publication

Abstract

This research explored how a more student-directed learning design can support the creation of togetherness and belonging in a community of distance learners in formal higher education. Postgraduate students in a New Zealand School of Education experienced two different learning tasks as part of their online distance learning studies. The tasks centered around two online asynchronous discussions each for the same period of time and with the same group of students, but following two different learning design principles. All messages were analyzed using a twostep analysis process, content analysis and social network analysis. Although the findings showed a balance of power between the tutor and the students in the first high e-moderated activity, a better pattern of group interaction and community feeling was found in the low e-moderated activity. The paper will discuss the findings in terms of the implications for learning design and the role of the tutor.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of ASCILITE - Australian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education Annual Conference 2012
EditorsM. Brown, M. Hartnett, T. Stewart
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2012
EventAnnual conference of the Australian Society for Computers in Tertiary Education - Wellington, Australia
Duration: 25 Nov 201228 Nov 2012

Conference

ConferenceAnnual conference of the Australian Society for Computers in Tertiary Education
Abbreviated titleASCILITE 2012
CountryAustralia
CityWellington
Period25/11/1228/11/12

Keywords

  • learning design
  • online discussions
  • online tutors
  • power dynamics
  • social network analysis

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  • Creating a culture for critical and situated technology use through effective learning design

    Wheeler, A., Vlachopoulos, P. & Cope, S., 1 Jan 2012, Proceedings of ASCILITE - Australian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education Annual Conference 2012. Brown, M., Hartnett, M. & Stewart, T. (eds.).

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Published conference outputConference publication

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