The importance of understanding the behavioural phenotypes of genetic syndromes associated with intellectual disability

Jane Waite, Mary Heald, Lucy Wilde, Kate Woodcock, Alice Welham, Dawn Adams, Chris Oliver

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Behavioural phenotype research is of benefit to a large number of children with genetic syndromes and associated developmental delay. This article presents an overview of this research area and demonstrates how understanding pathways between gene disorders and behaviour can inform our understanding of the difficulties individuals with genetic syndromes and developmental delay experience, including self-injurious behaviour, social exploitation, social anxiety, social skills deficits, sensory differences, temper outbursts and repetitive behaviours. In addition, physical health difficulties and their interaction with behaviour are considered. The article demonstrates the complexity involved in assessing a child with a rare genetic syndrome.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)468-472
JournalPaediatrics and Child Health (United Kingdom)
Volume24
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2014

Bibliographical note

© 2014, Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

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