The influence of age and trait attributions on recruitment selection

J.R. Badger, K.V.G. Thomson, C. Senior, M.J.R. Butler

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

Abstract

The role of interpersonal attraction into the recruitment selection is gaining research attention.
Early work in the domain of the influence of attraction in organisations suggested that men are given more resources, such as higher salaries and promotions. However, recent research has found women have an automatic in-group bias. It was suggested that female interviewers are more likely to hire another female. In contrast, male interviewers were found to be equally as likely to hire men as women. To resolve these two conflicting findings a behavioural experiment was set up looking at gender, attractiveness and recruitment selection. Forty participants, twenty male and twenty female, of varying ages (18-65) were recruited through age stratified sampling. Participants took on the role of manager of a medium sized company and were shown twenty photographs of faces previously rated for attractiveness. On initial viewing participants were asked to decide whether they would firstly hire the person and secondly give as many reasons for their decision. Findings from this research show that in all age groups male and female participants gave females (especially attractive females) more jobs, except in the case of the 18-21 year old females who gave attractive males more jobs. On examining the reasons behind the participant’s decisions, it was evident that if you appeared confident, friendly, youthful and attractive you were 46% more likely to receive the job. However, if you were perceived to be untrustworthy, lazy, arrogant and unintelligent you were 49% more likely not to receive the job. These findings shed light on the various processes that may underpin human resource decisions in an organisational setting.
Original languageEnglish
Pages159
Publication statusPublished - May 2006
Event2006 Student Members Group Annual Conference - Cardiff, United Kingdom
Duration: 31 Mar 2006 → …

Conference

Conference2006 Student Members Group Annual Conference
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityCardiff
Period31/03/06 → …

Fingerprint

Attribution
Attractiveness
Attraction
Resources
Human resources
Age groups
Managers
Stratified sampling
Salary
Recruitment and selection
Experiment

Cite this

Badger, J. R., Thomson, K. V. G., Senior, C., & Butler, M. J. R. (2006). The influence of age and trait attributions on recruitment selection. 159. Abstract from 2006 Student Members Group Annual Conference, Cardiff, United Kingdom.
Badger, J.R. ; Thomson, K.V.G. ; Senior, C. ; Butler, M.J.R. / The influence of age and trait attributions on recruitment selection. Abstract from 2006 Student Members Group Annual Conference, Cardiff, United Kingdom.
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Badger, JR, Thomson, KVG, Senior, C & Butler, MJR 2006, 'The influence of age and trait attributions on recruitment selection', 2006 Student Members Group Annual Conference, Cardiff, United Kingdom, 31/03/06 pp. 159.

The influence of age and trait attributions on recruitment selection. / Badger, J.R.; Thomson, K.V.G.; Senior, C.; Butler, M.J.R.

2006. 159 Abstract from 2006 Student Members Group Annual Conference, Cardiff, United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

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Badger JR, Thomson KVG, Senior C, Butler MJR. The influence of age and trait attributions on recruitment selection. 2006. Abstract from 2006 Student Members Group Annual Conference, Cardiff, United Kingdom.