The relative contributions of colour and luminance signals towards the visuomotor localisation of targets in human peripheral vision

Hiroshi Ashida*, Noriko Yamagishi, Stephen J. Anderson

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We sought to determine the extent to which colour (and luminance) signals contribute towards the visuomotor localization of targets. To do so we exploited the movement-related illusory displacement a small stationary window undergoes when it has a continuously moving carrier grating behind it. We used drifting (1.0-4.2 Hz) red/green-modulated isoluminant gratings or yellow/black luminance-modulated gratings as carriers, each curtailed in space by a stationary, two-dimensional window. After each trial, the perceived location of the window was recorded with reference to an on-screen ruler (perceptual task) or the on-screen touch of a ballistic pointing movement made without visual feedback (visuomotor task). Our results showed that the perceptual displacement measures were similar for each stimulus type and weakly dependent on stimulus drift rate. However, while the visuomotor displacement measures were similar for each stimulus type at low drift rates (<4 Hz), they were significantly larger for luminance than colour stimuli at high drift rates (>4 Hz). We show that the latter cannot be attributed to differences in perceived speed between stimulus types. We assume, therefore, that our visuomotor localization judgements were more susceptible to the (carrier) motion of luminance patterns than colour patterns. We suggest that, far from being detrimental, this susceptibility may indicate the operation of mechanisms designed to counter the temporal asynchrony between perceptual experiences and the physical changes in the environment that give rise to them. We propose that perceptual localisation is equally supported by both colour and luminance signals but that visuomotor localisation is predominantly supported by luminance signals. We discuss the neural pathways that may be involved with visuomotor localization. © 2007 Springer-Verlag.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)425-434
Number of pages10
JournalExperimental Brain Research
Volume183
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2007

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Sensory Feedback
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Keywords

  • colour
  • illusion
  • localization
  • motion
  • vision
  • visuomotor

Cite this

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The relative contributions of colour and luminance signals towards the visuomotor localisation of targets in human peripheral vision. / Ashida, Hiroshi; Yamagishi, Noriko; Anderson, Stephen J.

In: Experimental Brain Research, Vol. 183, No. 4, 12.2007, p. 425-434.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Yamagishi, Noriko

AU - Anderson, Stephen J.

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