The role of emotional labour and role stress on burnout and psychological strain in high contact service employees

Ian N. Lings, Geoff Durden, Nick J. Lee, John W. Cadogan

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference publication

Abstract

This study examines the relationships between job demands (in the form of role stressors and emotional management) and employee burnout amongst high contact service employees.
Employees in customer facing roles are frequently required to manage overwhelming, conflicting or ambiguous demands, which they may feel ill-equipped to handle. Simultaneously, they must manage the emotions they display towards customers, suppressing some, and expressing others, be they genuine or contrived. If the in-role effort required of employees exceeds their inherent capacity to cope, burnout may result. Burnout, in turn, can have serious detrimental consequences for the psychological well being of employees. We find that both emotional management and role stressors impact burnout. We also confirm that burnout predicts psychological strain. In line with the Job Demands and Resources Model, we examine the mitigating impact of perceived support on these relationships but do not find a significant mitigating impact.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of Academy of Marketing Conference 2010
Publication statusPublished - 2010
EventAcademy of Marketing Conference 2010 - Coventry, United Kingdom
Duration: 6 Jul 20108 Jul 2010

Conference

ConferenceAcademy of Marketing Conference 2010
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityCoventry
Period6/07/108/07/10

Keywords

  • emotional labour
  • role stress
  • burnout
  • psychological strain
  • high contact
  • employees
  • distress

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