The social organization of careers as a source of sustained competitive advantage: The case of Singapore

Samuel Aryee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Couched in a resource-based model of competitive advantage and using Singapore as a case study, this paper demonstrates how the Singapore government has actively influenced the development, allocation and utilization of its human resources to create and sustain competitive advantage in strategically selected industrial clusters. When the concept of career is conceptualized as a repository of skills, this paper suggests, career choice could be influenced by societal self-interest as much as by individual self-interest. Societal self-interest as manifested in the social organization of careers or skills possessed by a nation's work-force is suggested as a critical factor in a nation's competitiveness in selected industrial clusters. The implications of linking career to a nation's competitiveness for careers research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)67-88
Number of pages22
JournalInternational Journal of Human Resource Management
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1994

Fingerprint

Personnel
Social organization
Competitive advantage
Singapore
Competitiveness
Industrial cluster
Career choice
Repository
Workforce
Human resources
Resource-based
Critical factors
Government

Cite this

@article{15cffbb3b9104a808b5d08601f7c797e,
title = "The social organization of careers as a source of sustained competitive advantage: The case of Singapore",
abstract = "Couched in a resource-based model of competitive advantage and using Singapore as a case study, this paper demonstrates how the Singapore government has actively influenced the development, allocation and utilization of its human resources to create and sustain competitive advantage in strategically selected industrial clusters. When the concept of career is conceptualized as a repository of skills, this paper suggests, career choice could be influenced by societal self-interest as much as by individual self-interest. Societal self-interest as manifested in the social organization of careers or skills possessed by a nation's work-force is suggested as a critical factor in a nation's competitiveness in selected industrial clusters. The implications of linking career to a nation's competitiveness for careers research are discussed.",
author = "Samuel Aryee",
year = "1994",
doi = "10.1080/09585199400000004",
language = "English",
volume = "5",
pages = "67--88",
journal = "International Journal of Human Resource Management",
issn = "0958-5192",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "1",

}

The social organization of careers as a source of sustained competitive advantage: The case of Singapore. / Aryee, Samuel.

In: International Journal of Human Resource Management, Vol. 5, No. 1, 1994, p. 67-88.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The social organization of careers as a source of sustained competitive advantage: The case of Singapore

AU - Aryee, Samuel

PY - 1994

Y1 - 1994

N2 - Couched in a resource-based model of competitive advantage and using Singapore as a case study, this paper demonstrates how the Singapore government has actively influenced the development, allocation and utilization of its human resources to create and sustain competitive advantage in strategically selected industrial clusters. When the concept of career is conceptualized as a repository of skills, this paper suggests, career choice could be influenced by societal self-interest as much as by individual self-interest. Societal self-interest as manifested in the social organization of careers or skills possessed by a nation's work-force is suggested as a critical factor in a nation's competitiveness in selected industrial clusters. The implications of linking career to a nation's competitiveness for careers research are discussed.

AB - Couched in a resource-based model of competitive advantage and using Singapore as a case study, this paper demonstrates how the Singapore government has actively influenced the development, allocation and utilization of its human resources to create and sustain competitive advantage in strategically selected industrial clusters. When the concept of career is conceptualized as a repository of skills, this paper suggests, career choice could be influenced by societal self-interest as much as by individual self-interest. Societal self-interest as manifested in the social organization of careers or skills possessed by a nation's work-force is suggested as a critical factor in a nation's competitiveness in selected industrial clusters. The implications of linking career to a nation's competitiveness for careers research are discussed.

UR - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09585199400000004

U2 - 10.1080/09585199400000004

DO - 10.1080/09585199400000004

M3 - Article

VL - 5

SP - 67

EP - 88

JO - International Journal of Human Resource Management

JF - International Journal of Human Resource Management

SN - 0958-5192

IS - 1

ER -