The spatial patterns of Pick bodies, Pick cells and Alzheimer's disease pathology in Pick's disease

R. Armstrong*, N. Cairns, P. Lantos

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The spatial patterns of Pick bodies (PB), Pick cells (PC), senile plaques (SP) and neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) were studied in the frontal and temporal lobe in nine cases of Pick's disease (PD). Pick bodies exhibited clustering in 41/44 (93%) of analyses and clusters of PB were regularly distributed parallel to the tissue boundary in 24/41 (58%) of analyses. Pick cells exhibited clustering with regular periodicity of clusters in 14/16 (88%) analyses, SP in three out of four (75%) analyses and NFT in 21/27 (78%) analyses. The largest clusters of PB were observed in the dentate gyrus and PC in the frontal cortex. In 10/17 (59%) brain areas studied, a positive or negative correlation was observed between the densities of PB and PC. The densities of PB and NFT were not significantly correlated in the majority of brain areas but a negative correlation was observed in seven of 29 (24%) brain areas. The data suggest that PB and PC in patients with PD exhibit essentially the same spatial patterns as SP and NFT in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Lewy bodies (LB) in dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). In addition, there was a spatial correlation between the clusters of PB and PC, suggesting a pathogenic relationship between the two lesions. However, in the majority of tissues examined there was no spatial correlation between the clusters of PB and NFT, suggesting that the two lesions develop in association with different populations of neurons.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)64-70
Number of pages7
JournalNeuropathology
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1999

Keywords

  • Clustering
  • Neurofibrillary tangle
  • Pick body
  • Pick cell
  • Pick's disease
  • Senile plaque

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