The spatial patterns of plaques and tangles in Alzheimer's disease do not support the 'cascade hypothesis'

Richard A. Armstrong, D. Myers, C.U.M. Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In Alzheimer's disease (AD), the 'Cascade hypothesis' proposes that the formation of paired helical filaments (PHF) may be casually linked to the deposition of beta/A4 protein. Hence, there should be a close spatial relationship between senile plaques and cellular neurofibrillary tangles in a local region of the brain. In tissue from 6 AD patients, plaques and tangles occurred in clusters and individual clusters were often regularly spaced along the cortical strip. However, the clusters of plaques and tangles were in phase in only 4/32 cortical tissues examined. Hence, the data were not consistent with the 'Cascade hypothesis' that beta/A4 and PHF are directly linked in AD.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)16-20
Number of pages5
JournalDementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1993

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • cascade hypothesis
  • senile plaques
  • neurofibrillary tangles
  • spatial patterns

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