To be(long) or not to be(long): social identification in organizational contexts

Rolf van Dick, Ulrich Wagner, Jost Stellmacher, Oliver Christ, Patrick A. Tissington

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In the past few years, ideas of Social Identity Theory and Self-Categorization Theory have been successfully applied to the organizational domain. In this article, the authors provide an overview of these recent developments and present a concept of social identification in organizational contexts, based on these theories. The assumptions of this framework are that (a) social identification in organizational contexts is a multifaceted concept consisting of different dimensions and foci (or targets), (b) higher levels of identification are related to higher productivity and more positive work-related attitudes, and (c) identification is a very flexible concept that is linked to the situational context. The authors present the results of a series of field and laboratory studies in which the proposed relationships are analyzed and, in the main, confirmed. Copyright © 2006 Heldref Publications.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)189-218
Number of pages30
JournalGenetic, Social and General Psychology Monographs
Volume131
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

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Social Identification

Keywords

  • commitment
  • organizational identification
  • social identity

Cite this

van Dick, Rolf ; Wagner, Ulrich ; Stellmacher, Jost ; Christ, Oliver ; Tissington, Patrick A. / To be(long) or not to be(long) : social identification in organizational contexts. In: Genetic, Social and General Psychology Monographs. 2005 ; Vol. 131, No. 3. pp. 189-218.
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To be(long) or not to be(long) : social identification in organizational contexts. / van Dick, Rolf; Wagner, Ulrich; Stellmacher, Jost; Christ, Oliver; Tissington, Patrick A.

In: Genetic, Social and General Psychology Monographs, Vol. 131, No. 3, 2005, p. 189-218.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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