Topographical guidance of intervertebral disc cell growth in vitro: towards the development of tissue repair strategies for the anulus fibrosus

William E Johnson, Andrew Wootton, Alicia El Haj, Stephen M. Eisenstein, Adam S. Curtis, Sally Roberts

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The anulus fibrosus (AF) of the intervertebral disc consists of concentric sheets of collagenous matrix that is synthesised during embryogenesis by aligned disc cells. This highly organised structure may be severely disrupted during disc degeneration and/or herniation. Cell scaffolds that incorporate topographical cues as contact guidance have been used successfully to promote the healing of injured tendons. Therefore, we have investigated the effects of topography on disc cell growth. We show that disc cells from the AF and nucleus pulposus (NP) behaved differently in monolayer culture on micro-grooved membranes of polycaprolactone (PCL). Both cell types aligned to and migrated along the membrane's micro-grooves and ridges, but AF cells were smaller (or less spread), more bipolar and better aligned to the micro-grooves than NP cells. In addition, AF cells were markedly more immunopositive for type I collagen, but less immunopositive for chondroitin-6-sulphated proteoglycans than NP cells. There was no evidence of extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition. Disc cells cultured on non-grooved PCL did not show any preferential alignment at sub-confluence and did not differ in their pattern of immunopositivity to those on grooved PCL. We conclude that substratum topography is effective in aligning disc cell growth and may be useful in tissue engineering for the AF. However, there is a need to optimise cell sources and/or environmental conditions (e.g. mechanical influences) to promote the synthesis of an aligned ECM.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)389-396
Number of pages8
JournalEuropean Spine Journal
Volume15
Issue number3 supplement
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2006

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Intervertebral Disc
Growth
Extracellular Matrix
In Vitro Techniques
Annulus Fibrosus
Chondroitin
Intervertebral Disc Degeneration
Membranes
Proteoglycans
Tissue Engineering
Collagen Type I
Tendons
Embryonic Development
Cues
Cultured Cells

Keywords

  • intervertebral disc
  • anulus fibrosus
  • tissue engineering
  • topography
  • cell culture

Cite this

Johnson, William E ; Wootton, Andrew ; El Haj, Alicia ; Eisenstein, Stephen M. ; Curtis, Adam S. ; Roberts, Sally. / Topographical guidance of intervertebral disc cell growth in vitro : towards the development of tissue repair strategies for the anulus fibrosus. In: European Spine Journal. 2006 ; Vol. 15 , No. 3 supplement. pp. 389-396.
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Topographical guidance of intervertebral disc cell growth in vitro : towards the development of tissue repair strategies for the anulus fibrosus. / Johnson, William E; Wootton, Andrew; El Haj, Alicia; Eisenstein, Stephen M.; Curtis, Adam S.; Roberts, Sally.

In: European Spine Journal, Vol. 15 , No. 3 supplement, 08.2006, p. 389-396.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T2 - towards the development of tissue repair strategies for the anulus fibrosus

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