Tradition versus technology: careers fairs in the 21st Century

Christiane Brennan, Margaret Daly, Eileen Fitzpatrick, Edward Sweeney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The traditional methods of graduate recruitment do not adequately meet the needs of the changing profile of students and graduates. As industry becomes internationalized, the needs of employers are also changing. Graduate recruitment is in response to short term needs and varying levels of experience are required. A case study method was used in Dublin Institute of Technology to evaluate effectiveness of a virtual careers fair in providing greater access to job opportunities for students and graduates. Access by employers to potential employees was also measured. Findings showed that while access improved, other issues requiring attention emerged.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)23-41
Number of pages19
JournalInternational Journal for Educational and Vocational Guidance
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004

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graduate
career
employer
institute of technology
student
employee
Fairs
21st Century
industry
experience
Employers
Employees
Industry
Dublin

Bibliographical note

The final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/B:IJVO.0000021056.29294.06

Cite this

Brennan, Christiane ; Daly, Margaret ; Fitzpatrick, Eileen ; Sweeney, Edward. / Tradition versus technology : careers fairs in the 21st Century. In: International Journal for Educational and Vocational Guidance. 2004 ; Vol. 4, No. 1. pp. 23-41.
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Tradition versus technology : careers fairs in the 21st Century. / Brennan, Christiane; Daly, Margaret; Fitzpatrick, Eileen; Sweeney, Edward.

In: International Journal for Educational and Vocational Guidance, Vol. 4, No. 1, 2004, p. 23-41.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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