Triggering trust: to what extent does the question influence the answer when evaluating the perceived importance of trust triggers?

Jo Lumsden*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Trust is a critical component of business to consumer (B2C) e-Commerce success. In the absence of typical environmental cues that consumers use to assess vendor trustworthiness in the offline retail context, online consumers often rely on trust triggers embedded within e-Commerce websites to contribute to the establishment of sufficient trust to make an online purchase. This paper presents and discusses the results of a series of studies which took an initial look at the extent to which the context or manner in which trust triggers are evaluated may exert influence on the perceived importance attributed to individual triggers. We hope that our investigations will help inform the evaluation approaches adopted to assess consumer trust. © 2009 The Author.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 23rd British HCI group annual conference on people and computers
Subtitle of host publicationcelebrating people and technology
PublisherBritish Computer Society
Pages214-223
Number of pages10
ISBN (Print)9781906124878
Publication statusPublished - 2009
Event23rd British HCI Group Annual Conference on People and Computers: Celebrating People and Technology - Cambridge, United Kingdom
Duration: 1 Sep 20095 Sep 2009

Conference

Conference23rd British HCI Group Annual Conference on People and Computers: Celebrating People and Technology
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityCambridge
Period1/09/095/09/09

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Keywords

  • e-commerce
  • trust trigger
  • trust
  • evaluation

Cite this

Lumsden, J. (2009). Triggering trust: to what extent does the question influence the answer when evaluating the perceived importance of trust triggers? In Proceedings of the 23rd British HCI group annual conference on people and computers: celebrating people and technology (pp. 214-223). British Computer Society .