Uncertainty and the influence of group norms in the attitude-behaviour relationship

Joanne R. Smith*, Michael A. Hogg, Robin Martin, Deborah J. Terry

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Two studies were conducted to examine the impact of subjective uncertainty on conformity to group norms in the attitude-behaviour context. In both studies, subjective uncertainty was manipulated using a deliberative mindset manipulation (McGregor, Zanna, Holmes, & Spencer, 2001). In Study 1 (N = 106), participants were exposed to either an attitude-congruent or an attitude-incongruent in-group norm. In Study 2(N = 83), participants were exposed to either a congruent, incongruent, or an ambiguous in-group norm. Ranges of attitude-behaviour outcomes, including attitude-intention consistency and change in attitude-certainty, were assessed. In both studies, levels of group-normative behaviour varied as a function of uncertainty condition. In Study 1, conformity to group norms, as evidenced by variations in the level of attitude-intention consistency, was observed only in the high uncertainty condition. In Study 2, exposure to an ambiguous norm had different effects for those in the low and die high uncertainty conditions. In the low uncertainty condition, greatest conformity was observed in the attitude-congruent norm condition compared with an attitude-congruent or ambiguous norm. In contrast, individuals in the high uncertainty condition displayed greatest conformity when exposed to either an attitude-congruent or an ambiguous in-group norm. The implications of these results for the role of subjective uncertainty in social influence processes are discussed. © 2007 The British Psychological Society.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)769-792
Number of pages24
JournalBritish Journal of Social Psychology
Volume46
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2007

Fingerprint

Uncertainty

Keywords

  • subjective uncertainty
  • conformity
  • group norms
  • attitude–behaviour context
  • manipulation

Cite this

Smith, Joanne R. ; Hogg, Michael A. ; Martin, Robin ; Terry, Deborah J. / Uncertainty and the influence of group norms in the attitude-behaviour relationship. In: British Journal of Social Psychology. 2007 ; Vol. 46, No. 4. pp. 769-792.
@article{09442bff8acd4e6ca7534e36478f20be,
title = "Uncertainty and the influence of group norms in the attitude-behaviour relationship",
abstract = "Two studies were conducted to examine the impact of subjective uncertainty on conformity to group norms in the attitude-behaviour context. In both studies, subjective uncertainty was manipulated using a deliberative mindset manipulation (McGregor, Zanna, Holmes, & Spencer, 2001). In Study 1 (N = 106), participants were exposed to either an attitude-congruent or an attitude-incongruent in-group norm. In Study 2(N = 83), participants were exposed to either a congruent, incongruent, or an ambiguous in-group norm. Ranges of attitude-behaviour outcomes, including attitude-intention consistency and change in attitude-certainty, were assessed. In both studies, levels of group-normative behaviour varied as a function of uncertainty condition. In Study 1, conformity to group norms, as evidenced by variations in the level of attitude-intention consistency, was observed only in the high uncertainty condition. In Study 2, exposure to an ambiguous norm had different effects for those in the low and die high uncertainty conditions. In the low uncertainty condition, greatest conformity was observed in the attitude-congruent norm condition compared with an attitude-congruent or ambiguous norm. In contrast, individuals in the high uncertainty condition displayed greatest conformity when exposed to either an attitude-congruent or an ambiguous in-group norm. The implications of these results for the role of subjective uncertainty in social influence processes are discussed. {\circledC} 2007 The British Psychological Society.",
keywords = "subjective uncertainty, conformity, group norms, attitude–behaviour context, manipulation",
author = "Smith, {Joanne R.} and Hogg, {Michael A.} and Robin Martin and Terry, {Deborah J.}",
year = "2007",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1348/014466606X164439",
language = "English",
volume = "46",
pages = "769--792",
journal = "British Journal of Social Psychology",
issn = "0144-6665",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "4",

}

Uncertainty and the influence of group norms in the attitude-behaviour relationship. / Smith, Joanne R.; Hogg, Michael A.; Martin, Robin; Terry, Deborah J.

In: British Journal of Social Psychology, Vol. 46, No. 4, 12.2007, p. 769-792.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Uncertainty and the influence of group norms in the attitude-behaviour relationship

AU - Smith, Joanne R.

AU - Hogg, Michael A.

AU - Martin, Robin

AU - Terry, Deborah J.

PY - 2007/12

Y1 - 2007/12

N2 - Two studies were conducted to examine the impact of subjective uncertainty on conformity to group norms in the attitude-behaviour context. In both studies, subjective uncertainty was manipulated using a deliberative mindset manipulation (McGregor, Zanna, Holmes, & Spencer, 2001). In Study 1 (N = 106), participants were exposed to either an attitude-congruent or an attitude-incongruent in-group norm. In Study 2(N = 83), participants were exposed to either a congruent, incongruent, or an ambiguous in-group norm. Ranges of attitude-behaviour outcomes, including attitude-intention consistency and change in attitude-certainty, were assessed. In both studies, levels of group-normative behaviour varied as a function of uncertainty condition. In Study 1, conformity to group norms, as evidenced by variations in the level of attitude-intention consistency, was observed only in the high uncertainty condition. In Study 2, exposure to an ambiguous norm had different effects for those in the low and die high uncertainty conditions. In the low uncertainty condition, greatest conformity was observed in the attitude-congruent norm condition compared with an attitude-congruent or ambiguous norm. In contrast, individuals in the high uncertainty condition displayed greatest conformity when exposed to either an attitude-congruent or an ambiguous in-group norm. The implications of these results for the role of subjective uncertainty in social influence processes are discussed. © 2007 The British Psychological Society.

AB - Two studies were conducted to examine the impact of subjective uncertainty on conformity to group norms in the attitude-behaviour context. In both studies, subjective uncertainty was manipulated using a deliberative mindset manipulation (McGregor, Zanna, Holmes, & Spencer, 2001). In Study 1 (N = 106), participants were exposed to either an attitude-congruent or an attitude-incongruent in-group norm. In Study 2(N = 83), participants were exposed to either a congruent, incongruent, or an ambiguous in-group norm. Ranges of attitude-behaviour outcomes, including attitude-intention consistency and change in attitude-certainty, were assessed. In both studies, levels of group-normative behaviour varied as a function of uncertainty condition. In Study 1, conformity to group norms, as evidenced by variations in the level of attitude-intention consistency, was observed only in the high uncertainty condition. In Study 2, exposure to an ambiguous norm had different effects for those in the low and die high uncertainty conditions. In the low uncertainty condition, greatest conformity was observed in the attitude-congruent norm condition compared with an attitude-congruent or ambiguous norm. In contrast, individuals in the high uncertainty condition displayed greatest conformity when exposed to either an attitude-congruent or an ambiguous in-group norm. The implications of these results for the role of subjective uncertainty in social influence processes are discussed. © 2007 The British Psychological Society.

KW - subjective uncertainty

KW - conformity

KW - group norms

KW - attitude–behaviour context

KW - manipulation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=38149007062&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1348/014466606X164439/abstract

U2 - 10.1348/014466606X164439

DO - 10.1348/014466606X164439

M3 - Article

C2 - 18062848

VL - 46

SP - 769

EP - 792

JO - British Journal of Social Psychology

JF - British Journal of Social Psychology

SN - 0144-6665

IS - 4

ER -