Understanding the labour–environmental relationship in Britain, 1967–2011: a new narrative using political opportunity structure and coalition theory

Tom Farnhill*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Orthodox depictions of a fraught labour–environmental relationship privileging class, ideological and programmatic differences are problematised by newly quantified evidence of British unions' pro-environmental policy-making since 1967. The following narrative blends widely accepted accounts of the fortunes of both movements with an evaluation of Britain's shifting political opportunity structure and coalition theory to identify an alternative range of constraints and opportunities influencing the propensity and capacity of both movements to interact effectively, culminating recently in unions' emergence as environmental actors in their own right.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)427-447
Number of pages21
JournalLabor History
Volume55
Issue number4
Early online date7 Jul 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Dec 2014

Keywords

  • coalition theory
  • environment
  • labour–environmental relationship
  • unions

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