'Urine testing is a waste of time': newly diagnosed Type 2 diabetes patients' perceptions of self-monitoring

Julia Lawton, Elizabeth A. Peel, M. Douglas, Odette Parry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aims To date, there is no convincing evidence that non-insulin treated patients who undertake self-blood glucose monitoring (SBGM) have better glycaemic control than those who test their urine. This has led to a recommendation that non-insulin dependent patients undertake urine testing, which is the cheaper option. This recommendation does not take account of patients' experiences and views. This study explores the respective merits of urine testing and SBGM from the perspectives of newly diagnosed patients with Type 2 diabetes. Methods Qualitative study using repeat in-depth interviews with 40 patients. Patients were interviewed three times at 6-monthly intervals over 1 year. Patients were recruited from hospital clinics and general practices in Lothian, Scotland. The study was informed by grounded theory, which involves concurrent data collection and analysis. Results Patients reported strongly negative views of urine testing, particularly when they compared it with SBGM. Patients perceived urine testing as less convenient, less hygienic and less accurate than SBGM. Most patients assumed that blood glucose meters were given to those with a more advanced or serious form of diabetes. This could have implications for how they thought about their own disease. Patients often interpreted negative urine results as indicating that they could not have diabetes. Conclusions Professionals should be aware of the meanings and understandings patients attach to the receipt and use of different types of self-monitoring equipment. Guidelines that promote the use of consistent criteria for equipment allocation are required. The manner in which negative urine results are conveyed needs to be reconsidered.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1045-1048
Number of pages4
JournalDiabetic Medicine
Volume21
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2004

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Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Urine
Blood Glucose Self-Monitoring
Equipment and Supplies
Scotland
General Practice
Blood Glucose
Guidelines
Interviews

Keywords

  • blood glucose meter
  • self-monitoring
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • urine testing

Cite this

Lawton, Julia ; Peel, Elizabeth A. ; Douglas, M. ; Parry, Odette. / 'Urine testing is a waste of time': newly diagnosed Type 2 diabetes patients' perceptions of self-monitoring. In: Diabetic Medicine. 2004 ; Vol. 21, No. 9. pp. 1045-1048.
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'Urine testing is a waste of time': newly diagnosed Type 2 diabetes patients' perceptions of self-monitoring. / Lawton, Julia; Peel, Elizabeth A.; Douglas, M.; Parry, Odette.

In: Diabetic Medicine, Vol. 21, No. 9, 09.2004, p. 1045-1048.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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