Using a combined motivational and volitional intervention to promote exercise and healthy dietary behaviour among undergraduates

Ying Zhang, Richard Cooke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aims: This study tested the impact of combining a motivational intervention based on protection motivation theory (PMT, Rogers, 1983 [18]) plus a volitional intervention based on action planning and coping planning, as a way to promote the prevention of type 2 diabetes among UK undergraduates. Methods: Eighty-four participants were randomly assigned to either a control group or one of three experimental conditions: motivational intervention (PMT), volitional intervention (APCP), or combined motivational and volitional intervention (PMT&APCP). PMT variables, dietary and exercise behaviours were measured at three time-points over a four-week period. Results: The motivational intervention significantly changed PMT variables. The combined motivational and volitional intervention significantly decreased fat intake and increased the frequency of exercise relative to all other groups, and significantly increased the amount of fruit and vegetables consumed relative to control and volitional intervention groups. Conclusions: These results suggest that motivational intervention is effective at changing cognitions but changing behaviour requires an intervention based on both motivation and volition.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)215-223
Number of pages9
JournalDiabetes Research and Clinical Practice
Volume95
Issue number2
Early online date3 Nov 2011
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2012

Fingerprint

Motivation
Vegetables
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Cognition
Fruit
Fats
Control Groups

Bibliographical note

NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Diabetes research and clinical practice. Zhang, Y & Cooke, R, 'Using a combined motivational and volitional intervention to promote exercise and healthy dietary behaviour among undergraduates', Diabetes research and clinical practice, vol 95, no. 2 (2012) DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.diabres.2011.10.006

Keywords

  • action plan
  • coping plan
  • intention
  • exercise
  • diet

Cite this

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abstract = "Aims: This study tested the impact of combining a motivational intervention based on protection motivation theory (PMT, Rogers, 1983 [18]) plus a volitional intervention based on action planning and coping planning, as a way to promote the prevention of type 2 diabetes among UK undergraduates. Methods: Eighty-four participants were randomly assigned to either a control group or one of three experimental conditions: motivational intervention (PMT), volitional intervention (APCP), or combined motivational and volitional intervention (PMT&APCP). PMT variables, dietary and exercise behaviours were measured at three time-points over a four-week period. Results: The motivational intervention significantly changed PMT variables. The combined motivational and volitional intervention significantly decreased fat intake and increased the frequency of exercise relative to all other groups, and significantly increased the amount of fruit and vegetables consumed relative to control and volitional intervention groups. Conclusions: These results suggest that motivational intervention is effective at changing cognitions but changing behaviour requires an intervention based on both motivation and volition.",
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Using a combined motivational and volitional intervention to promote exercise and healthy dietary behaviour among undergraduates. / Zhang, Ying; Cooke, Richard.

In: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, Vol. 95, No. 2, 02.2012, p. 215-223.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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