Visual function and subjective quality of life compared in subjects with acquired macular disease

Charlotte A. Hazel, Keziah L. Petre, Richard A. Armstrong, Mark T. Benson, N. Andrew Frost

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

PURPOSE: To determine the objective measures of visual function that are most relevant to subjective quality of vision and perceived reading ability in patients with acquired macular disease. METHODS: Twenty-eight patients with macular disease underwent a comprehensive assessment of visual function. The patients also completed a vision-related quality-of-life questionnaire that included a section of general questions about perceived visual performance and a section with specific questions on reading. RESULTS: Results of all tests of vision correlated highly with reported vision-related quality-of-life impairment. Low-contrast tests explained most of the variance in self-reported problems with reading. Text-reading speed correlated highly with overall concern about vision. CONCLUSIONS: Reading performance is strongly associated with vision-related quality of life. High-contrast distance acuity is not the only relevant measure of visual function in relation to the perceived visual performance of a patient with macular disease. The results suggest the importance of print contrast, even over print size, in reading performance in patients with acquired macular disease.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1309-1315
Number of pages7
JournalInvestigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science
Volume41
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - May 2000

Keywords

  • visual function
  • subjective
  • quality of vision
  • perceived reading ability
  • acquired
  • macular disease
  • METHODS
  • Twenty-eight patients with macular disease underwent a comprehensive assessment of visual function. The patients also completed a vision-related quality-of-life questionnaire that included a section of general questions about perceived visual performance and a section with specific questions on reading.
  • RESULTS
  • Results of all tests of vision correlated highly with reported vision-related quality-of-life impairment. Low-contrast tests explained most of the variance in self-reported problems with reading. Text-reading speed correlated highly with overall concern about vision.
  • CONCLUSIONS
  • Reading performance is strongly associated with vision-related quality of life. High-contrast distance acuity is not the only relevant measure of visual function in relation to the perceived visual performance of a patient with macular disease. The results suggest the importance of print contrast
  • even over print size
  • in reading performance in patients with acquired macular disease.

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